Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 10:00am on Thursday, May 28:
• Grand Lake elevation was 753.25 feet. Daily target elevation for May 28 is 743.80 feet.

• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate (east spillway) were open at Pensacola Dam,

discharging 6,376 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.

• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 14,113 cfs of water through generation.

• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 20,489 cfs.

• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 55,755 cfs.

 
• Lake Hudson elevation was 633.53 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.

• No gates were open at Robert S. Kerr dam.

• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 23,748 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineer’s updated crest prediction for Grand Lake is 754.51 feet on Saturday, May 30. The updated prediction for Lake Hudson is 635.31 feet, also on May 30.

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GRDA Police offer boating tips, other safety reminders during times of higher lake levels

A PWC and a boat (in the background) make their way across the waters of Grand Lake, near the Pensacola Dam. The GRDA Police Department reminds boaters that buoys (like those also visible in this photo) are in place above and below the dams to restrict access to floodgate areas or areas associated with power generation.

Langley – With recent heavy rains and high inflows of water into the Grand River watershed, both Grand and Hudson lakes are currently above normal elevations. In recent days, the United States Army Corps of Engineers has also directed floodgates to be open at Pensacola Dam as part of an overall flood control effort for the watershed. Due to these current conditions, the Grand River Dam Authority Police Department is urging boaters to use extreme caution when visiting GRDA’s lakes.

“Despite the elevated levels, we realize that many boaters are still looking forward to visiting the lakes,” said GRDA Assistant General Manager/Chief of Law Enforcement and Lake Operations Brian Edwards. “We simply ask that they use caution, practice common sense and be well aware of their surroundings at all times.”

GRDA also offers the following boating tips to keep in mind during times of elevated lake levels:

• Be aware of floating debris. Higher lake levels can mean more driftwood and debris floating in the water. Please be on the lookout as you are boating.
• Be mindful of the changing shoreline topography and the possibility of now-submerged structures. Things like stumps, picnic tables, retaining walls and other structures typically located along the shoreline may now be submerged due to the lake levels. Use extreme caution and avoid unfamiliar areas of the shoreline.
• Stay away from floodgates and spillways. There is a chance that floodgates could be open at both Pensacola Dam (Grand Lake) and Robert S. Kerr Dam (Lake Hudson) as you are boating. If that is the case, please observe the buoys designating the spillway areas and allow plenty of distance between those locations and your boat.
• Do not go into spillway areas below the dam. Please use common sense and stay away from areas below floodgates where water is being released. The swift water can be very dangerous.
• If you need immediate assistance, the GRDA Police recommends you call 911. However, if you are on the boat with no cell phone access, you can use Marine Band 16 to radio for help.
• Finally, a good reminder for boating in all conditions: always wear your life jacket.

Warning signs, like this one located at the low water dam area below GRDA’s Robert S. Kerr Dam, are in place around all GRDA hydroelectric to help keep the public safe. GRDA also reminds the public to be aware of flashing lights, buoys, fencing and sirens also intended to limit access and serve as safety measures around the facilities.

Additionally, it is important that the public make safety a priority in all areas near GRDA hydroelectric facilities. Whether you are on land or water, the GRDA Police Department wants you to be aware of the following information related to dam safety. Keep in mind that notifications such as signs, buoys, sirens, fencing and flashing lights are all intended to notify those in the area when floodgates are open, generators are operating or water is rising swiftly. Also, it is very important to remember that it is against the law to enter into floodwater releases.

The following tips are shared to help keep you safe near GRDA facilities:

Signs: Posted at GRDA hydroelectric facility (Pensacola Dam, Robert S. Kerr Dam, and the Salina Pumped Storage Project) to warn of extreme danger in floodgate areas. Please be aware of other signs near GRDA facilities that notify you of no trespassing areas, no diving areas, or unstable footing.

Buoys: Red buoys and cabling above and below spillway gates and hydroelectric powerhouses restrict access to dangerous areas associated with power generation or floodgate releases.

Flashing Lights: At hydroelectric facilities, the flashing lights are initiated when floodgates are opened or generation is underway.

Fencing: In place to identify borders and to restrict access to certain areas near the hydroelectric facilities.

Sirens: These are located at various places on the hydroelectric facilities and are utilized prior to the operation of hydroelectric generators and/or floodgates.

For more information on the GRDA Police Department and lake safety, or for information on how an officer can assist you, contact the department at (918) 256 0911 or visit us online at grda.com. You can also follow GRDA and receive the latest lake level information and other updates on Facebook and Twitter (search GRDA), or sign up to receive text messages from GRDA by clicking on the “News” drop down menu on our website, then clicking on the “Text alerts” tab. The service is free. You can also download the “Grand Lake app” to Apple or Android devices and receive the latest lake notifications.

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Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 10:00am on Wednesday, May 27:
• Grand Lake elevation was 751.99 feet. Daily target elevation for May 27 is 743.73 feet.

• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, three (3) floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam,

discharging 16,182 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.

• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 14,060 cfs of water through generation.

• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 30,242 cfs.

• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 62,921 cfs.

 
• Lake Hudson elevation was 631.96 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.

• No gates were open at Robert S. Kerr dam.

• Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 25,920 cfs of water through generation.

• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 36,673 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineer’s updated crest prediction for Grand Lake is 754.50 feet on Saturday, May 30. The updated prediction for Lake Hudson is 635.30 feet, also on May 30.

# # #

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 9:00am on Tuesday, May 26:
• Grand Lake elevation was 750.21 feet. Daily target elevation for May 26 is 743.67 feet.

• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, three (3) floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam,

discharging 12,744 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.

• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 14,078 cfs of water through generation.

• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 26,822 cfs.

• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 78,693 cfs.

 
• Lake Hudson elevation was 630.01 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.

• No gates were open at Robert S. Kerr dam.

• Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 25,920 cfs of water through generation.

• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 37,315 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineer’s updated crest prediction for Grand Lake is 754.26 feet on Saturday, May 30. The updated prediction for Lake Hudson is 635.15 feet, also on May 30.

# # #

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 11:00am on Wednesday, May 20:
• Grand Lake elevation was 745.71 feet. Daily target elevation for May 20 is 743.27 feet.

• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, seven (7) floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam,

discharging 11,788 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.

• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,882 cfs of water through generation.

• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 25,670 cfs.

• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 24,838 cfs.

 
• Lake Hudson elevation was 620.21 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.

• No gates were open at Robert S. Kerr dam.

• Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 25,110 cfs of water through generation.

• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 28,072 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers have not indicated any gate changes for today. The crest prediction for Grand Lake is 746.07 feet on May 21, and 621.10 feet on May 23 for Hudson Lake.

# # #

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At noon on Tuesday, May 19:

Seven floodgates were open along the east spillways of Pensacola Dam on Tuesday.

Seven floodgates were open along the east spillways of Pensacola Dam on Tuesday.

• Grand Lake elevation was 745.40 feet. Daily target elevation for May 19 is 743.20 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, seven (7) floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 10,920 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,782 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 24,702 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 36,979 cfs.

 
• Lake Hudson elevation was 619.73 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• No gates were open at Robert S. Kerr dam.
• Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 24,840 cfs of water through generation.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 26,377 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers have not indicated any gate changes for today. The crest prediction for Grand is 746.07 feet on May 21, and 620.99 feet on May 25 for Hudson.

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GRDA recognizes National Safe Boating Week, promotes life jacket use

“Wear it”  is a simple reminder that could save a life …

Why is proper life jacket use so important?

According to the United States Coast Guard, drowning was the reported cause of death in 75 percent of all recreational boating fatalities in 2013 (latest statistics). And of those fatalities, 84 percent were not wearing life jackets. In other words, life jackets save lives.

GRDA Officer Derrick Bidleman throws a t-shirt to a young swimmer as a reward for getting “caught” wearing his life jacket on Grand Lake during Summer 2014. Year round, the GRDA Police Department promotes proper life jacket use. National Safe Boating Week (May 16 -22) is also a great time to pass along several tips about life jacket styles and proper fitting. The most important tip?  Wear it!

GRDA Officer Derrick Bidleman throws a t-shirt to a young swimmer as a reward for getting “caught” wearing his life jacket on Grand Lake during Summer 2014. Year round, the GRDA Police Department promotes proper life jacket use. National Safe Boating Week (May 16 -22) is also a great time to pass along several tips about life jacket styles and proper fitting. The most important tip? Wear it!

To help promote their use, the Grand River Dam Authority is joining with the National Safe Boating Council to recognize the week of May 16-22 as National Safe Boating Week. While safe boating is a priority all year long, this week – which precedes Memorial Day weekend and the traditional start of boating season – is a great time revisit life jacket tips and also learn about the new models designed for different water-related activities.

It is true that most of today’s life jackets are comfortable and easy to wear. The bulky jackets of yesteryear have been replaced with innovative new options like inflatable jackets that allow for much more mobility and flexibility while also keeping you cool in the hot Oklahoma sun. It really does not matter what activity you are involved in – fishing, riding a personal watercraft, skiing or even boating in cold weather – there is a life jacket designed just for that.

However, the most comfortable life jacket in the world does you no good if you are not wearing it. That is why “Wear It!” is the simple reminder used to promote life jackets during National Safe Boating Week.

Before you hit the water this boating season (or anytime) keep these tips in mind, from the National Safe Boating Council and GRDA:

• There are life jacket styles available for almost any boating activity.
• For cruising in an open motorboat: Comfort is key – choose a life jacket you’ll want to wear. For ages 16 and older, inflatable life jackets are a great option.
• For fishing: Vest-style life jackets come with features such as pockets and clips to replace the fishing vest and keep the angler safe.
• For personal watercraft and water sports: Inherently buoyant lighter-weight life jackets are rugged, with multiple buckles and clasps to keep them secure after impact with the water.
• For hunting and cold weather: Full coats and suits are available in camouflage colors for waterfowl hunting and for those who boat when air and water temperatures are cool.
• For paddling: Special life jackets are designed with large openings for arms to allow ease of movement.
• For children: Virtually all styles available are sized especially for children – some with cartoon characters, straps for pulling children from the water and high-visibility schemes.
• For pets: Life jackets are even available for our four-legged friends. It’s helpful to purchase one with a handle on top to easily pull your pet out of the water, if needed.
• No matter what the activity or style chosen, the most important thing is this: Remember to grab a life jacket and ‘Wear It!’

As you choose a life jacket to fit your needs, it’s also very important to make sure it fits you properly. Why? A jacket that is too big will cause the flotation device to push up around your face, which could be dangerous. On the other hand, jackets that are too small may not be able to keep your body afloat. Also, please remember that life jackets meant for adult sized people do not work for children. If you are boating with children, make sure they are wearing properly fitted, child-sized life jackets based on their weight. Do not buy a life jacket for your child to “grow into.”

Finally, here are some proper fitting guidelines to keep in mind:

• Check the manufacturer’s ratings for your size and weight.
• Make sure the life jacket is properly zipped or buckled.
• Raise your arms straight up over your head while wearing your life jacket and ask a friend to grasp the tops of the arm openings, gently pulling up.
• If there is excess room above the openings and the life jacket rides up over your chin or face, it does NOT fit properly. A snug fit in these areas signals a properly fitting life jacket.
• Make sure your life jacket is U.S. Coast Guard approved.
• Double check that your life jacket is appropriate for your favorite water activities. Read the label!
• Check your life jacket is in good serviceable condition, with no tears or holes. Test to make sure it works properly.

Please keep these in mind as you head to the water this summer and for more information on GRDA, our lakes, or water safety, visit us online at grda.com. You can also follow us on Twitter and like our Facebook page.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. GRDA’s low-cost, reliable power touches 75 of 77 counties in the state and serves as an important economic development engine for Oklahoma. At no cost to Oklahoma taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years. The efforts of Team GRDA facilitate over $450 million in economic activity in Oklahoma annually.

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GRDA 2015 Temporary Variance Request


Please take notice that on April 28, 2015, The Grand River Dam Authority solicited comments from federal, state, and local officials on the attached request for a temporary variance to GRDA’s annual rule curve. The request will be submitted, with comments, to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on May 28, 2015.

If the public would like to submit comments regarding this request, please forward them via email to nreese@grda.com, via mail to P.O. Box 409, 226 West Dwain Willis Avenue, Vinita, OK 74301, or via fax to 918-256-2983 by close of business on May 27th, 2015. All comments arriving by this date will be compiled and made part of the filing as Attachment G.

Economic Impact of the GRDA

Notice Of Waiver Request And Public Hearing

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is in receipt of an application for Thunder Bay Marina, LLC on Grand Lake, in Delaware County, Oklahoma. The applicant requests approval to modify an existing project by constructing two additional covered docks, one open air dock, rebuild one existing dock, and install a floating pool on one of the docks. The applicant has requested a waiver of GRDA’s 125 foot and parallel slip rule as part of this application.

A public hearing is scheduled for Monday, April 13, 2015 at 10:00 AM at the GRDA Administrative Headquarters, located at 226 W Dwain Willis Avenue, Vinita OK, 74301

GRDA wishes to solicit comments on this proposed project from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Assistant General Manager of Ecosystems and Lake Management, PO Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Notice Of Public Meeting

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) will hold a public meeting on Friday, April 17, 2015 at 6:00 PM at:

Grove City Hall

104 W 3rd

Grove OK, 74344

The purpose of this meeting is to obtain public comments regarding the implementation of a “No Wake” zone in the Honey Creek arm of Grand Lake.

If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Brian Edwards, AGM of Lake Operations and Chief of Law Enforcement, PO Box 70, Langley OK 74350 or 918-256-0880.

Notice To The Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 78 feet across a cove, which measures 158 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: Kyle & Rachel Soper

Location: Court House Hollow

Lake Address: 59781 E 318 Lane, Grove OK 74344

Legal Description: Township 24N, Range 23E, Section 14

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext. 40632.

Notice To The Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 124 feet across a cove, which measures 194 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: Paul D. & Nancy K. Storts

Location: Woodard

Lake Address: 58191 E 332 Loop, Jay, Ok 74346

Legal Description: Township 24N, Range 23E, Section 27

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext. 40632.

New initiatives will take a comprehensive approach to watershed management

GRDA to work with University of Oklahoma, Grand Lake Watershed Alliance Foundation …

Langley – A new agreement between the Grand River Dam Authority and the University of Oklahoma (OU) is intended to bring a greater focus to the waters of the Grand River watershed, while a related initiative will help share the importance of that watershed with the public across the four-state region.

A graphic illustrating the benefits of Grand River’s waters and the impacts on the surrounding communities and industries

A graphic illustrating the benefits of Grand River’s waters and the impacts on the surrounding communities and industries.

At its December 2014 meeting, the GRDA Board of Directors gave its approval to the five-year interagency agreement that will take a comprehensive approach to watershed conservation, lake management and GRDA’s plan for relicensing its hydroelectric facilities with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). In January 2015, the board also approved an agreement with the Grand Lake Watershed Alliance Foundation (GLWAF) for the development of a watershed educational campaign. Together, the initiatives represent a new and comprehensive approach to this important natural resource that lies within the boundaries of Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

According to GRDA Assistant General Manager of Ecosystems/Lake Management Dr. Darrell Townsend, the 1935 legislation that established GRDA as a conservation and reclamation district for the Grand River was also comprehensive in its approach. It addressed not only the waters, but also the entire watershed area in regards to irrigation, forestation and the “distribution of the waters of the Grand River and its tributaries … for other useful purposes.”

Today, nearly 75 years after GRDA constructed the first dam on the Grand River, plenty of useful purposes remain. Whether the realm is recreation, industry, real estate, municipal uses, hydroelectric production or even economic development, the waters of the Grand River watershed are vital to a large and diverse region.

It is diverse because the watershed covers roughly 10,000 square miles, stretches across those four states and even straddles two separate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regions. From Joplin, Missouri to Fairland, Oklahoma and from Burlington, Kansas to Sulphur Springs, Arkansas, the watershed both impacts and is impacted by a large and diverse population area.

In his presentation to the GRDA Board, Townsend said the comprehensive agreement with the University of Oklahoma had several objectives, beginning with the establishment of a multidisciplinary team.

“This group will compile and assess watershed data” said Townsend. “They will also work to enhance public access to that data, target priority areas of watershed management and support GRDA’s FERC relicensing process for Pensacola Dam.”

Townsend also said the team will focus on parameters such as sedimentation, bacteria, dissolved oxygen, blue green algae and nutrients, as it works to develop and maintain a healthy watershed; another primary objective of the interagency agreement. In recent years, Grand Lake has faced many of the same issues that other lakes in the country have faced, such as blue green algae and E.Coli. Not only do those issues impact water quality but they also impact area economies. Townsend pointed out that, as recently as August 2014, the city of Toledo, Ohio, spent close to $200 thousand for bottled water, during an algae-related water emergency that affected the city’s primary water supplies. A comprehensive healthy watershed effort will address those issues going forward.

As for the agreement itself, Townsend added that GRDA already has a beneficial working history with OU. That partnership has led to scientific collaboration, new equipment for the GRDA Water Lab, and internship opportunities in the lab for university students. Together, the two partners have addressed issues such as habitable structures on the lake shore, environmental remediation (in the tri-state mining district), storm water runoff (in Langley and Grove), and a flood routing study to assess rule curve modifications on water surface elevations in Miami, along with several others.

Townsend said university partners will provide technical expertise, experienced leadership and institutional support throughout the five-year comprehensive watershed plan.

“The OU partnership taps into a broad scientific knowledge base spanning multiple disciplines, said Townsend, “and that expertise becomes a valuable asset when working with a watershed of this size.”

Educating the public across such a large area is the primary goal of the GLWAF and the new agreement with GRDA will help both organizations raise awareness of the watershed and share the important ways the public can help care for this valuable natural resource.

GLWAF was formed in 2007 to help preserve, protect, and improve water quality within the four-state watershed. A 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation, GLWAF is the only organizational voice for the entire watershed.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. GRDA’s low-cost, reliable power touches 75 of 77 counties in the state and serves as an important economic development engine for Oklahoma. At no cost to Oklahoma taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years. The efforts of Team GRDA facilitate over $450 million in economic activity in Oklahoma annually.

# # #

GRDA Breaks Ground on new combined cycle electric generation facility

“A win-win for our customers and the state of Oklahoma …”

Approximately 300 guests were on hand on Friday, January 23, to help the Grand River Dam Authority break ground on its new Unit 3 combined cycle generation plant at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, east of Chouteau).

Approximately 300 guests were on hand on Friday, January 23, to help the Grand River Dam Authority break ground on its new Unit 3 combined cycle generation plant at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, east of Chouteau).

Chouteau — January 23, 2015 was an historic day for the Grand River Dam Authority as it officially broke ground on a new, 495 megawatt (MW) combined cycle gas plant.

The event marked the first time in over 30 years that the Authority began construction on a new electric generation project, and took place at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, formerly Coal Fired Complex) in the shadow of the last generation GRDA constructed, in the early 1980s.

“This is a great day,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “It’s nice weather, but even if there were a foot of snow on the ground, this would still be a great day.”

It was great not only for GRDA, but also for the state of Oklahoma, added Sullivan. He told a crowd of approximately 300 guests at the groundbreaking ceremony that the day was really about the future of GRDA and its long-term commitment to serving its customers all across the state. Those customers (many who had representatives in attendance) include municipalities, electric cooperatives and industries in Oklahoma. Together, he said, they were very involved in helping GRDA get to this day.

“I want to start by thanking our customers,” said Sullivan. “It’s because of the relationships with our customers that [GRDA] exists. You stood with us in the decision to build this facility and you’ve made a long-term commitment to GRDA.”

Sullivan reminded the crowd that all of GRDA’s municipal customer communities have signed long-term contracts with the Authority that will continue the partnerships through 2042.

“We’re returning that long-term commitment by building this facility,” he said.

The new unit, which will cost approximately $296 million to complete, will have the potential to be the most efficient combined cycle generator in the United States. GRDA is purchasing the unit from Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) and it will be constructed in Savannah, Georgia. While several of these models are in operation in Asia, GRDA’s will be the first MHPSA unit of this type in the western hemisphere.

Of course, getting the unit from the idea phase to the point of ground breaking was a long process, as many other options were also weighed, researched and discussed.

“Our committee reviewed numerous options by our GRDA staff and our consulting engineers,” GRDA Director Steve Spears told the crowd. Spears, the

Miss Grand Lake 2015 Gretchen Neftzger was on hand during the Grand River Dam Authority’s groundbreaking ceremony for its new Unit 3 combined cycle gas plant, on Friday, January 23, at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, east of Chouteau). Neftzger sang “God Bless America” during the ceremony.

Miss Grand Lake 2015 Gretchen Neftzger was on hand during the Grand River Dam Authority’s groundbreaking ceremony for its new Unit 3 combined cycle gas plant, on Friday, January 23, at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, east of Chouteau). Neftzger sang “God Bless America” during the ceremony.

city manager in Cushing and longtime municipal customer representative on the GRDA Board, chaired the special ad hoc committee put in place several years ago to explore new generation options.

“Let me assure you that every option was considered and fully vetted,” said Spears. “This new facility will burn Oklahoma natural gas and allow us to further diversify our resources. I consider this a win-win for our customers and the state of Oklahoma.”

Unit 3 will produce electricity in two ways: natural gas will be used to fuel a combustion turbine-generator, and then heat from that process will be recaptured and used to produce steam to turn another steam turbine-generator. Because of this heat recovery process, it is expected to be a very efficient generation source.

The facility’s potential was not lost on Oklahoma Secretary of Energy and Environment Michael Teague. In his address to the crowd, Teague said successful power generation really requires three things to be present: reliability, affordability and sustainability.

“Oklahoma has the fifth cheapest electricity in our country right now, because of the work that goes on, as a great example, right here at the Grand River Energy Center,” said Teague, adding that in order to balance all the successful power generation components, “ it takes a long term vision, it takes leadership and it takes a team.”

GRDA Chairman Tom Kimball addresses the crowd during the Grand River Dam Authority’s groundbreaking ceremony for its new Unit 3 combined cycle gas plant, on Friday, January 23, at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, east of Chouteau).

GRDA Chairman Tom Kimball addresses the crowd during the Grand River Dam Authority’s groundbreaking ceremony for its new Unit 3 combined cycle gas plant, on Friday, January 23, at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC, east of Chouteau).

GRDA Chairman Tom Kimball spoke highly of that team – the GRDA workforce – that operates and maintains the Authority’s facilities round-the-clock, 24/7/365.

“You can call them associates, you can call them employees or you can call them staff, but when you call them, they respond,” said Kimball. He also thanked the customers for signing the long-term deals with GRDA, which in turn helped the Authority’s credit rating and made financing of the Unit 3 less expensive with better credit ratings.

“We showed the rating agencies the strength of our customers; the people who had enough foresight to stand up and sign a 30-year contract with GRDA going forward,” said Kimball. “That is the kind of commitment it takes to make something like this happen.”

Along with MHPSA, other major contractors/suppliers in the project will include Black & Veatch (owner’s engineer), Hitachi HVB (electrical equipment), Nooter/Eriksen (heat recovery steam generator) TIC/Kiewit (construction) and Enable Midstream (natural gas pipeline). Unit 3 is expected to be operational by the spring of 2017.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. GRDA’s low-cost, reliable power touches 75 of 77 counties in the state and serves as an important economic development engine for Oklahoma. At no cost to Oklahoma taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years. The efforts of Team GRDA facilitate over $450 million in economic activity in Oklahoma annually.

# # #

Police Promotions

The Grand River Dam Authority recently recognized the promotions of three members of the GRDA Police Department. During a special ceremony on Tuesday, January 27, GRDA Superintendent of Homeland Security Chris Carlson (second from left), was promoted to the rank of major while GRDA Officers Tyler Brown (center) and Casey King (second from right) were also promoted to the rank of captain. The officers received their promotions and new insignia from GRDA Assistant General Manager of Law Enforcement/Lake Operations Brian Edwards (right) and GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan (left).

“This was a special day for GRDA and our department,” said Edwards. “These men have done a great job for us and we will continue to depend on their professionalism, expertise and dedication in the future. These promotions were very well-deserved.”

 

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Notice Of Public Meeting

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

 

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) will hold a public meeting on Friday, February 13, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at:

Grand River Dam Authority

Ecosystems & Education Center

Grand Hall

420 E. Hwy 28

Langley, OK 74350

The purpose of this meeting is to educate and to obtain public comments regarding proposed changes to the Grand River Dam Authority Lake Rules and Regulations. These proposed changes are on the GRDA website at www.grda.com.

Comments will also be accepted at a formal public hearing on February 18, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. at 226 W. Dwain Willis Ave., Vinita, Ok.

GRDA wishes to solicit comments on these changes from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Assistant General Manager of Ecosystems and Lake Management, P. O. Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Public Notice of Event Attendance

PUBLIC NOTICE
OF EVENT ATTENDANCE
OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, GRAND RIVER DAM AUTHORITY
AND
THE HONORABLE MARY FALLIN, GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA
FRIDAY, January 23, 2015

Notice is hereby given that three or more members of the Board of Directors of
the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) and the Honorable Mary Fallin,
Governor of the State, may gather together to attend the Groundbreaking
Ceremony for the GRDA’s Grand River Energy Center’s Unit 3 Combined Cycle
Natural Gas Electric Power Generation Unit, on Friday, January 23RD, 2015,
at 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. This event will be held at GRDA’s Grand River
Energy Center, 812 Highway 412B, Chouteau, Oklahoma. This event is by
invitation only. No action will be taken.

Note: Posted at Craig County Clerk’s Office, Vinita, Oklahoma; Grand River Dam Authority Administration
Headquarters, 226 W. Dwain Willis Avenue, Vinita, Oklahoma; Mayes County Clerk’s Office, Pryor, Oklahoma;
GRDA’s Grand River Energy Center, 812 Highway 412B, Chouteau, Oklahoma; and at www.grda.com.

Floodplain analysis associated with proposed rule curve modifications for Grand Lake

GRDA Police share safe boating tips for the winter season

Langley – Even though the calendar says winter, many people still find their way to the lakes this time of year for cold weather fishing, duck hunting and other outings. However, when the water and air are much colder, and there is less boat traffic on the lakes and river, there are a few special boating tips to keep in mind.

“Cell phones are of greater importance in the winter,” said GRDA Superintendent of Homeland Security Chris Carlson. “There are just fewer boaters around to flag down for emergency and non-emergency help.”

Because of that, Carlson added it is very important to keep those phones dry at all times in some sort of waterproof container.

GRDA Police Officers, bundled up for cold weather conditions, make their way down the Grand River on a winter day in 2014. If you are planning on visiting the lake or rivers during the winter months, GRDA Police offer some seasonal safe boating tips you should keep in mind.

GRDA Police Officers, bundled up for cold weather conditions, make their way down the Grand River on a winter day in 2014. If you are planning on visiting the lake or rivers during the winter months, GRDA Police offer some seasonal safe boating tips you should keep in mind.

A whistle – attached to your life jacket – is also an important piece of equipment for wintertime boaters. Producing a loud and effective call for help with a whistle will take much less energy than shouting for help and waving your arms, especially in cold, wet conditions.

It is also important to remember that cold water can rob the body of its heat 25 times faster than cold air. That can drastically reduce the time of exposure needed to experience hypothermia.

“So if your boat does capsize, your main priority is to get as much of your body out of the water as possible,” said Carlson. “If you can, climb on to the overturned vessel or nearby debris or get to the nearest shore or dock.”

Also, in cold winter temperatures, wet clothing is actually colder than less clothing and can lead to hypothermia more quickly.

“So you should remove as much of the wet clothing as possible as soon as possible,” said Carlson. “You will be warmer with less clothing than with wet clothing.”

In fact, dressing properly for winter boating is a very important step that should not be overlooked. While many people dress in additional layers to guard against the cold temperatures, they need to know that those layers can present a hazard if you do accidentally go into the water. When other clothing is tucked into bibbed overalls or wading pants it can actually cause the water to be trapped. That can cause the amount of energy needed to stay afloat to increase considerably at a time when muscles are cramping and movements are increasingly more difficult. It is very important that life jackets have sufficient flotation to support heavy, water-logged clothing.

Of course, the other option is to simply dress for the outing in proper winter boating attire, said Carlson. “There is a wide range of flotation-equipped cold weather gear available. It is designed to provide an individual with all the warmth they need without sacrificing safety.”

Whether you are boating in January or July, it is also important to file a “float plan” any time you visit the water. Let someone know where you intend to be boating, who is going with you and when you expect to return. Providing a description of the vessel and the number of occupants is also critical. Having a vessel that is in good working order is also very important.

Finally, when lake waters turn to ice patches, its best to stay clear of the area, whether you are in a boat or just walking along the shore. Typically Oklahoma does not get those below-freezing periods that generate ice thick enough to safely stand on.

“With that being said, it is possible for the ice to be weak enough to fall through in one area and thick enough to trap you underneath if you didn’t come right up to the top of the water in the same location,” said Carlson. “With no leverage in the water, and no chance of getting a gasp of air between the ice and water, this could prove deadly fast.”

By taking proper winter-time precautions, wearing proper gear and practicing the common sense boating safety tips that are applicable year-round, boaters can still enjoy the waters of Grand and Hudson lakes no matter what the calendar is showing.

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Notice to the Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please be advised Grand River Dam Authority is proposing changes to its Lake Rules and Purchasing Policy. In addition, new rules are proposed for Repairs and Improvements to Grand River Dam Authority Facilities. Written and oral comments will be accepted January 15, 2015 through February 16, 2015. Please note the Lake Rules were updated on January 29, 2015, with the changes highlighted in yellow.

For more information and the proposed rules
Chapter 20 Notice of Rulemaking Intent
Chapter 20 Proposed Acquisition Policy
Chapter 20 Rule Impact Statement
Chapter 35 Notice of Rulemaking Intent
Chapter 35 Proposed Lake Rules
Chapter 35 Rule Impact Statement

Notice To The Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 125 feet across a cove, which measures 225 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: Christopher Helt

Location: Honey Creek

Lake Address: 902 Inwood Drive, Grove, OK

Legal Description: Township 24N, Range 24E, Section 7

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext 40632.

Wagoner citizens hear from retail development specialist

Wagoner Mayor James Jennings (standing) welcomes participants to the community’s latest economic development visioning meeting, on Monday, November 17, at the Wagoner Civic Center.  Rickey Hayes, founder/principal of Retail Attractions, LLC was on hand to address the participants.

Wagoner Mayor James Jennings (standing) welcomes participants to the community’s latest economic development visioning meeting, on Monday, November 17, at the Wagoner Civic Center. Rickey Hayes, founder/principal of Retail Attractions, LLC was on hand to address the participants.

Wagoner – Approximately 30 Wagoner citizens and community leaders were on hand Monday night (November 17) for the latest meeting in a series of meetings geared towards boosting economic development in the community.

This most recent gathering was an opportunity for citizens to hear from Rickey Hayes, founder and principal of Retail Attractions, LLC. Hayes served as the economic development director for Owasso for six years, at a time when that community began to experience rapid retail growth. In 2007, he founded Retail Attractions and has since worked to attract new retail business to client communities in Oklahoma and surrounding states.

In April 2014, the Grand River Dam Authority contracted with Retail Attractions, as well as Smith & Gray LLC (industrial development) to assist all of its Oklahoma wholesale electric customer communities with economic development efforts. Like 15 other public power communities in the state, Wagoner owns and operates its own electric distribution system but purchases its wholesale electricity from GRDA. The community has been a public power partner with GRDA since 1947.

Hayes told the audience that Wagoner’s public power status can be an important advantage for recruiting new retail businesses. He also said that strong community involvement, as displayed by a large turnout for the meeting, is also a good starting point.

“I’ve been in communities of 250,000 people that couldn’t get this many interested people in the room,” Hayes told participants. “So it’s obvious you all want the same things for Wagoner.”

Being able to think outside the box and taking advantage of its location along Highway 69 were others ways Hayes said the community could benefit in an enhanced economic development effort.

This latest meeting comes after four “visioning” sessions facilitated by the Wagoner Public Works Authority (WPWA) and GRDA and led by Smith & Gray’s Tom Gray and Sherri Smith-Gray. Those sessions allowed participants to produce an action plan for future growth and begin building consensus on what that could look like.

The group’s next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, December 11, at 6PM (Wagoner Civic Center). At that meeting, a special guest speaker — Wes Stucky – will address the group. Stucky is president of Development Management, Inc., a consulting firm assisting economic development agencies and private developers in organization management and industrial site development. For 25 years, he served as president of the Ardmore Development Authority and Ardmore Chamber of Commerce. During his career, he has been known for finding innovative solutions to funding and developing projects.

All interested citizens are invited to attend this important community event. For more information, contact WPWA Director Dwayne Elam at (918) 485-4586.

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GRDA welcomes Owasso’s Vandevier to board of directors

GRDA Director Joseph “Joe” Vandevier

GRDA Director Joseph “Joe” Vandevier

Vinita – With a background in engineering and the oil and gas industry, Owasso’s Joseph “Joe” Vandevier is expected to bring a wealth of knowledge to his new role as a member of the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) Board of Directors.

On Tuesday (October 14), Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin announced that she was appointing Vandevier to a five-year term on the GRDA Board, through August 2019. He replaces outgoing GRDA Director Allen Wright (Edmond).

Vandevier began his service on the GRDA Board on Monday (October 20), during a special meeting in Tulsa.

“We look forward to Director Vandevier’s service and contributions to our organization,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “His experience speaks for itself and his leadership will be valuable to GRDA as we enter this exciting time in our history.”

Recently, GRDA completed pricing on a $320 million bond issue and will soon began construction on a 495 megawatt (MW) combined-cycle natural gas generation plant. The Authority has also expanded its wind generation portfolio in recent months and will also begin a major emissions control upgrade on one of its coal-fired units at its Grand River Energy Center.

“Joe Vandevier’s experience in management, business development and engineering brings a valuable perspective to the GRDA,” said Governor Fallin in a news release announcing his appointment. “His leadership and dedication will serve the GRDA and its members well.”

Vandevier is the founder and current managing member of Downhole Dynamics, a company that provides business and technical consulting for enhanced production in the oil and gas industry.

He has worked in that industry for the past 40 years in a variety of roles, having served as vice president of operations in the United States, Canada and Russia for Centrilift. He also served as president and chief operating officer of Wood Group ESP, and as a senior adviser for Baker Hughes. Vandevier also served as president of ProductionQuest, a business branch of Baker Hughes.

A member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, he received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and a master’s degree in engineering management from the University of Tulsa. Vandevier is also a member of the University Of Tulsa College Of Hall of Fame, where he is recognized for his contributions in the field of academic support, community service and professional achievement.

GRDA is governed by a seven-member board of directors comprised of representatives from each GRDA customer class (municipals, electric cooperatives and industrials) as well as the GRDA lakes area. Two at-large representatives also sit on the board. Appointments are made by the Oklahoma Governor (3), Speaker of the Oklahoma State House of Representatives and President Pro Tempore of the Oklahoma State Senate. Two other board positions are ex-officio positions, filled by the general manager of the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) and executive director of the Municipal Electric Systems of Oklahoma (MESO) or by their designees. Board members serve staggered, five-year terms, with one position opening each year, to ensure continuity.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable electricity touches75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years

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Floodwater release bulletin

At 10:30AM on Friday, October 17:

• Grand Lake elevation was 744.81. Daily target elevation for October 17 is 741.07 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 177 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,108 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 11,285 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 6,697 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 621.28 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
• Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 25,380 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 25,380 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 12,508 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers has requested the remaining floodgate be closed Saturday morning.

 

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