Wagoner citizens hear from retail development specialist

Wagoner Mayor James Jennings (standing) welcomes participants to the community’s latest economic development visioning meeting, on Monday, November 17, at the Wagoner Civic Center.  Rickey Hayes, founder/principal of Retail Attractions, LLC was on hand to address the participants.

Wagoner Mayor James Jennings (standing) welcomes participants to the community’s latest economic development visioning meeting, on Monday, November 17, at the Wagoner Civic Center. Rickey Hayes, founder/principal of Retail Attractions, LLC was on hand to address the participants.

Wagoner – Approximately 30 Wagoner citizens and community leaders were on hand Monday night (November 17) for the latest meeting in a series of meetings geared towards boosting economic development in the community.

This most recent gathering was an opportunity for citizens to hear from Rickey Hayes, founder and principal of Retail Attractions, LLC. Hayes served as the economic development director for Owasso for six years, at a time when that community began to experience rapid retail growth. In 2007, he founded Retail Attractions and has since worked to attract new retail business to client communities in Oklahoma and surrounding states.

In April 2014, the Grand River Dam Authority contracted with Retail Attractions, as well as Smith & Gray LLC (industrial development) to assist all of its Oklahoma wholesale electric customer communities with economic development efforts. Like 15 other public power communities in the state, Wagoner owns and operates its own electric distribution system but purchases its wholesale electricity from GRDA. The community has been a public power partner with GRDA since 1947.

Hayes told the audience that Wagoner’s public power status can be an important advantage for recruiting new retail businesses. He also said that strong community involvement, as displayed by a large turnout for the meeting, is also a good starting point.

“I’ve been in communities of 250,000 people that couldn’t get this many interested people in the room,” Hayes told participants. “So it’s obvious you all want the same things for Wagoner.”

Being able to think outside the box and taking advantage of its location along Highway 69 were others ways Hayes said the community could benefit in an enhanced economic development effort.

This latest meeting comes after four “visioning” sessions facilitated by the Wagoner Public Works Authority (WPWA) and GRDA and led by Smith & Gray’s Tom Gray and Sherri Smith-Gray. Those sessions allowed participants to produce an action plan for future growth and begin building consensus on what that could look like.

The group’s next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, December 11, at 6PM (Wagoner Civic Center). At that meeting, a special guest speaker — Wes Stucky – will address the group. Stucky is president of Development Management, Inc., a consulting firm assisting economic development agencies and private developers in organization management and industrial site development. For 25 years, he served as president of the Ardmore Development Authority and Ardmore Chamber of Commerce. During his career, he has been known for finding innovative solutions to funding and developing projects.

All interested citizens are invited to attend this important community event. For more information, contact WPWA Director Dwayne Elam at (918) 485-4586.

# # #

Notice of Waiver Request and Public Hearing

NOTICE OF WAIVER REQUEST AND PUBLIC HEARING

            The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is in receipt of an application for The Island Park Homeowners Association located on Grand Lake, in Delaware County, Oklahoma. The applicant requests approval to modify an existing dock with the addition of 2 slips, a breakwater, and become compliant with current GRDA rules and regulations with regard to their existing docks. The applicant has requested a waiver of GRDA’s 1/3 of the cove, 125 foot and parallel slip rule as part of this application.

             A public hearing is scheduled for Thursday, November 20th at 9:00 AM at the GRDA Administrative Headquarters, located at 226 W Dwain Willis Avenue, Vinita OK, 74301.

             GRDA wishes to solicit comments on this proposed project from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Assistant General Manager of Ecosystems and Lake Management, PO Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

GRDA welcomes Owasso’s Vandevier to board of directors

GRDA Director Joseph “Joe” Vandevier

GRDA Director Joseph “Joe” Vandevier

Vinita – With a background in engineering and the oil and gas industry, Owasso’s Joseph “Joe” Vandevier is expected to bring a wealth of knowledge to his new role as a member of the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) Board of Directors.

On Tuesday (October 14), Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin announced that she was appointing Vandevier to a five-year term on the GRDA Board, through August 2019. He replaces outgoing GRDA Director Allen Wright (Edmond).

Vandevier began his service on the GRDA Board on Monday (October 20), during a special meeting in Tulsa.

“We look forward to Director Vandevier’s service and contributions to our organization,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “His experience speaks for itself and his leadership will be valuable to GRDA as we enter this exciting time in our history.”

Recently, GRDA completed pricing on a $320 million bond issue and will soon began construction on a 495 megawatt (MW) combined-cycle natural gas generation plant. The Authority has also expanded its wind generation portfolio in recent months and will also begin a major emissions control upgrade on one of its coal-fired units at its Grand River Energy Center.

“Joe Vandevier’s experience in management, business development and engineering brings a valuable perspective to the GRDA,” said Governor Fallin in a news release announcing his appointment. “His leadership and dedication will serve the GRDA and its members well.”

Vandevier is the founder and current managing member of Downhole Dynamics, a company that provides business and technical consulting for enhanced production in the oil and gas industry.

He has worked in that industry for the past 40 years in a variety of roles, having served as vice president of operations in the United States, Canada and Russia for Centrilift. He also served as president and chief operating officer of Wood Group ESP, and as a senior adviser for Baker Hughes. Vandevier also served as president of ProductionQuest, a business branch of Baker Hughes.

A member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, he received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and a master’s degree in engineering management from the University of Tulsa. Vandevier is also a member of the University Of Tulsa College Of Hall of Fame, where he is recognized for his contributions in the field of academic support, community service and professional achievement.

GRDA is governed by a seven-member board of directors comprised of representatives from each GRDA customer class (municipals, electric cooperatives and industrials) as well as the GRDA lakes area. Two at-large representatives also sit on the board. Appointments are made by the Oklahoma Governor (3), Speaker of the Oklahoma State House of Representatives and President Pro Tempore of the Oklahoma State Senate. Two other board positions are ex-officio positions, filled by the general manager of the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) and executive director of the Municipal Electric Systems of Oklahoma (MESO) or by their designees. Board members serve staggered, five-year terms, with one position opening each year, to ensure continuity.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable electricity touches75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years

# # #

Floodwater release bulletin

At 10:30AM on Friday, October 17:

• Grand Lake elevation was 744.81. Daily target elevation for October 17 is 741.07 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 177 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,108 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 11,285 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 6,697 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 621.28 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
• Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 25,380 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 25,380 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 12,508 cfs.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers has requested the remaining floodgate be closed Saturday morning.

 

# # #

Floodwater release bulletin

At 10:00AM on Tuesday, October 14:

o Grand Lake elevation was 745.38. Daily target elevation for October 14 is 741 feet.
o At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, nine (9) floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 13,968 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
o Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 10,682 cfs of water through generation.
o Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 24,650 cfs.
o Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 30,302 cfs.

o Lake Hudson elevation was 619.60 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
o No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
o Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 24,300 cfs of water through generation.
o Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 24,734 cfs.
o Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 28,807 cfs.

# # #

GRDA’s Sullivan addresses infrastructure financing at DOE meeting

GRDA CEO Dan Sullivan (second from left) speaks to participants at a United States Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) public meeting on Monday, October 6, in New York City. Sullivan was a member of a panel of industry experts that addressed municipal bond tax exemptions and the relation to electric industry infrastructure. A member of the American Public Power Association (APPA) Board of Directors, Sullivan served on the panel on behalf of APPA. (APPA photo by John Godfrey)

GRDA CEO Dan Sullivan (second from left) speaks to participants at a United States Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) public meeting on Monday, October 6, in New York City. Sullivan was a member of a panel of industry experts that addressed municipal bond tax exemptions and the relation to electric industry infrastructure. A member of the American Public Power Association (APPA) Board of Directors, Sullivan served on the panel on behalf of APPA. (APPA photo by John Godfrey)

Vinita – For publicly-owned electric utilities like the Grand River Dam Authority, tax-exempt bonds continue to be an important financing tool. However, alterations to that exempt status could make it more difficult for these utilities to build the infrastructure they need to serve customers reliably.

That was one of the points made by Grand River Dam Authority Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan at a recent United States Department of Energy (DOE) event focused on national energy issues.

Speaking on behalf of the American Public Power Association (APPA) Sullivan was a panelist during DOE’s Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) on Monday, October 6, in New York City. The panel was put together to discuss the future of municipal bond tax exemptions and how that might affect investments in transmission, storage and distribution (TS&D) infrastructure. In other words, the infrastructure needed to support the national electric grid.

“We believe that if a new federal tax were imposed on municipal bond interest, it would increase the cost of issuing these bonds,” said Sullivan in his address. “This, in turn, would make infrastructure investments more difficult.”

In recent years, GRDA has joined with APPA, the Large Public Power Council and the nation’s public power industry in stressing the importance of tax-exempt bonds as a financing tool for publicly-owned utilities. Sullivan noted that even discussions about possible changes to the tax treatment of municipal bonds can drive up financing costs for public power utilities. If these utilities are left with stranded costs, it can make financing new infrastructure investments — needed to meet customer demand and maintain reliability — more expensive.

“I will focus my remarks today on the potential damage a change in the tax treatment of municipal bonds could have on my and other public power utilities’ ability to finance infrastructure investments,” added Sullivan. “While investor-owned utilities finance such investments through debt and equity, for a variety of reasons public power utilities rely almost exclusively on municipal bonds. In the last decade, nearly 1,400 power-related municipal bonds providing roughly $110 billion in new money financing were issued.”

That has been GRDA’s approach. In fact, Sullivan spoke at the QER just a day before retail pricing on GRDA’s $320 million bond issue. Most of the proceeds from that issue will be used to construct a new, combined cycle natural gas generation plant at GRDA’s Grand River Energy Center (GREC) near Chouteau, Oklahoma.

“This is certainly an issue we understand at GRDA,” said Sullivan, “and I think our recent bond offering is a good example of why it’s so important. Altering the tax exempt status could adversely affect public power ratepayers all across the country.”

In closing, Sullivan also addressed regulatory uncertainty as another issued faced by publicly-owned electric utilities as they look to build new infrastructure and prepare to meet the future needs of consumers.

“If the question is how to make infrastructure investments more bankable, the clear answer is to eliminate uncertainty,” Sullivan said. “I have talked about the risk of an unprecedented tax on municipal bonds, but the same is true about the risk utilities, our investors, and our customers face from regulatory uncertainty.”

He added that the risk of investments being rendered obsolete by new regulations and inconsistent policy objectives could make future policy decisions difficult and thus “limit the portfolio diversity that is foundational to our credit strength.”

Hosted by DOE Secretary Ernest Moniz, the QER meeting was open to the public for the purpose of gathering input on the energy infrastructure finance issue.

Based in Washington, D.C., APPA is the service organization for the nation’s more than 2,000 community-owned electric utilities. Collectively, these utilities serve more than 47 million Americans.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable electricity touches75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

# # #

Along with nation’s other large public power utilities … GRDA participating in first LPPC Investor Conference

Vinita – Just ahead of a major bond issue, the Grand River Dam Authority is taking the opportunity to spread the word about the benefits of its public power bonds and its future plans.

GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan, Chief Operating Officer Tim Brown and Chief Financial Officer Carolyn Dougherty were in New York City on Wednesday and Thursday (October 1 and 2), along with Oklahoma State Bond Advisor Jim Joseph, to take part in the first Large Public Power Council (LPPC) Investor Conference. The event was the opportunity for the nation’s largest publicly-owned electric utilities, like GRDA, to meet with 45 of the top investors in municipal and public power bonds.

At the first day of the conference, attendees gathered for a broad discussion on public power bonds. On day two, the GRDA team was able to sit down with various investors to talk about the specifics of GRDA bonds.

With GRDA expected to move forward with pricing on its $320 million bond issue next week (retail pricing on Tuesday, Oct. 7 and institutional pricing on Wednesday, Oct. 8) the timing was right for these meetings with investors.

“This is a great opportunity for us to tell our story to a very important audience,” said Sullivan. “It gives us the time we need to answer any questions they might have, while also detailing GRDA’s operations, recent successes and plans for the future. We were very pleased to be a part of this program.”

The LPPC is a group of the nation’s 26 largest publicly-owned electric utilities. GRDA has been a member since June of 2012. Sullivan currently serves on the LPPC Board of Governance and also spoke at the conference, as part of a panel addressing the impacts of new environmental regulations on public power utilities.

“LPPC is a very good fit for us,” said Sullivan. “The organization’s public policy priorities really mirror GRDA’s and that includes areas like tax and finance issues. Other utilities at this conference finance their infrastructure projects the same way we do at GRDA, through public power bonds.”

While GRDA will use the majority of the proceeds from this bond issue to construct the new gas plant, other proceeds will be used to complete emissions control upgrades on Unit 2. That unit is one of two existing coal fired generators at the Grand River Energy Center (east of Chouteau).

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable electricity touches75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

# # #

October 13 – 17 … Pensacola Dam roadway to be temporarily closed for inspection

In an effort to complete a required, federal inspection of the Pensacola Dam roadway and bridge decking, the Grand River Dam Authority is announcing that the portion of Highway 28 that crosses the dam will be closed October 13 - 17, from 8:30AM to 4:30PM.

In an effort to complete a required, federal inspection of the Pensacola Dam roadway and bridge decking, the Grand River Dam Authority is announcing that the portion of Highway 28 that crosses the dam will be closed October 13 – 17, from 8:30AM to 4:30PM.

Langley – In an effort to complete a required, federal inspection of the Pensacola Dam roadway and bridge decking, the Grand River Dam Authority is announcing that the portion of Highway 28 that crosses the dam will be closed October 13 – 17, from 8:30AM to 4:30PM (daily). The required inspection must take place every two years.

“A total road closure during the inspection hours allows us to complete this work more quickly and safely,” said GRDA Corporate Communications Director Justin Alberty. “We understand it will present an inconvenience for many travelers, but a total closing is necessary for the safety of the inspectors.”

Alberty added that GRDA will be working with contractors to complete the inspection of the structure and a roadway that has been accommodating traffic since its completion in 1940. Inspectors will use a special “snooper truck” to get an up close look at the bridge decking from the bottom side, at the top of each of the main dam’s 51 arches. The east spillways will also be inspected.

He also added that informational flyers, including a map for alternate routes, are being distributed to the public. That information will also be available at grda.com and on GRDA’s Facebook page. Temporary signs are also being posted near the dam to remind the traffic of the closing dates.

“We appreciate the public’s cooperation during this time, so that the work can progress smoothly,” said Alberty.

# # #

Pensacola Road Closing Alternate Routes
This map shows the alternate routes that can be taken during the temporary closure of the Pensacola Dam roadway, October 13-17, for a required inspection.
Traveling from Disney to Langley:
• Head east out of Disney on Highway 28 for approximately 10 miles, until the junction with Highway 20.
• Turn right (west) on Highway 20 and follow it, approximately 9 miles, to the Highway 20/82 junction.
• Stay straight through the junction on Highway 82 for approximately 4 miles into Langley.

Traveling from Langley to Disney:
• Head south out of Langley on Highway 82 for approximately 4 miles to the Highway 20/82 junction.
• Stay straight through the junction to follow Highway 20 east for approximately 9 miles.
• Then turn left (north) onto Highway 28 and follow it approximately 10 miles into Disney.

Notice to the public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 76 feet across a cove, which measures 117 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: Bob Warford

Location: Sun Harbor Estates

Lake Address: 26461 S 615 Loop, Grove, OK 74344

Legal Description: Township 25N, Range 23E, Section 24

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext 40632.

GRDA receives credit rating upgrades, new outlooks

Grand River Dam Authority linemen at work on a portion of the Authority’s electric distribution service in the MidAmerica Industrial Park near Pryor. GRDA’s low electric rates for industrial, municipal and electric cooperative customers across Oklahoma were key reasons why the Authority received credit rating upgrades last week.

Grand River Dam Authority linemen at work on a portion of the Authority’s electric distribution service in the MidAmerica Industrial Park near Pryor. GRDA’s low electric rates for industrial, municipal and electric cooperative customers across Oklahoma were key reasons why the Authority received credit rating upgrades last week.

Vinita – When the Grand River Dam Authority goes forward with its bond issue, totaling approximately $320 million next month, it will do so with improved credit ratings.

Last week, both Moody’s Investors Services and Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services issued upgrades and new outlooks on GRDA’s ratings.

For GRDA, it is action that comes at a very important time, just before the issuance of new debt. Another rating agency, Fitch, also improved its outlook on GRDA bonds last week.

“This is great news for GRDA,” said Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “I think it reflects the hard work and important decisions on the part of our board, management and workforce but more importantly, it will benefit all our ratepayers.”

Higher credit ratings can equal lower interest rates, Sullivan added, and they will also enable GRDA to save money on natural gas hedging in the future.

“That is very important as we moved towards construction of the new GRDA Unit 3,” said Sullivan. Construction of that facility – a combined cycle natural gas generation plant – will be funded with proceeds from the October bond issue.

On Tuesday (September 16) Moody’s announced it was raising GRDA’s from A2 to A1, with a stable outlook. The agency based its findings on several key factors including GRDA’s improved financial outlook and low rates. According to Moody’s, GRDA’s electric rates consistently rank among the lowest in Oklahoma while also ranking in the lowest 20 percent nationwide.

On Wednesday (September 17), Standard & Poor’s raised its rating of GRDA to an “A+” from an “A.” In a news release issued by the agency, S&P Credit Analyst Judith Waite said the GRDA “upgrade mainly reflects our view of stronger debt service coverage due primarily to lower debt service.”

Earlier this year, S&P had revised GRDA’s outlook, based on the previous “A” rating, from stable to positive. However, this latest action is the first rating upgrade GRDA has received from the agency since it moved GRDA to the “A” in 2008. Both the S&P and Moody’s upgrades are historic and represent the highest credit ratings GRDA has ever received.

Following those upgrades, Fitch announced on Friday (September 19) that it was affirming the “A” rating it had given to GRDA in 2008. The agency is also moving GRDA’s outlook from “stable” to “positive”.

“All these agency announcements followed their very thorough reviews of GRDA operations and financial position,” said Sullivan. “We are very pleased with their assessments and look forward to the bond issue and the upcoming projects it will fund.”

While GRDA will use the majority of the proceeds from this bond issue to construct the new gas plant, other proceeds will be used to complete emissions control upgrades on Unit 2. That unit is one of two existing coal fired generators at the Grand River Energy Center (east of Chouteau).

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable electricity touches75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

# # #

GRDA reminds public of hunting, camping rules for lakes area

An aerial view of GRDA’s W.R. Holway Reservoir (southeast of Salina). GRDA is reminding the public of the important rules in place for hunting and camping around its waters. GRDA photo by Katie Robbins.

An aerial view of GRDA’s W.R. Holway Reservoir (southeast of Salina). GRDA is reminding the public of the important rules in place for hunting and camping around its waters. GRDA photo by Katie Robbins.

Langley – As summer begins to give way to fall, the Grand River Dam Authority is reminding the public of the hunting and camping rules related to GRDA property.

Those rules, which can be found online at grda.com and are also available in hard copy at the GRDA Ecosystems and Education Center, cover the areas of hunting and fishing, firearms, ammo, and camping on GRDA property. While the public has free access to GRDA waters and is not charged for the right to engage in hunting, fishing, swimming or non-commercial boating, there are several rules that deal more specifically with firearms and camping.

Two very important rules that all should remember are that all hunting on GRDA property shall be conducted in accordance with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s regulations. It is also important to note that no camping is allowed on GRDA property except in designated areas.

GRDA is also reminding the public of the hunting moratorium for GRDA properties along the Neosho River in Ottawa County. In the interest of public health and safety, that moratorium is in place through December 31, 2016. No hunting is allowed on that property prior to that date. However, there are many other areas and options in the GRDA lakes area.

“We encourage the public to take advantage of the wonderful hunting, fishing and camping opportunities the lakes area offers,” said GRDA Assistant General Manager/Chief of Law Enforcement and Lake Operations Brian Edwards. “We also encourage them to be familiar with the rules that are in place to help protect the properties and those who enjoy them.”

To access the GRDA rules online, click on the “Lake Information” drop down menu on grda.com, then click the “GRDA Police” link. A GRDA Lake Rules booklet is also available, and the complete rules can also be found in the 2014-15 GRDA Lake Guide.

For more information, contact the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department at (918) 256 0723 or the GRDA Police Department at (918) 256 0911.

 

# # #

Notice to the public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 88 feet across a cove, which measures 72.4 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: Bret Thompson

Location: Stoney Point

Lake Address: 31690 S 571 Lane, Jay, Ok

Legal Description: Township 24N, Range 23E, Section 17

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext 40632.

With potential to save customers $50 million over the project’s lifetime … GRDA signs 100 MW renewable energy purchase agreement with Apex Clean Energy

Vinita, Oklahoma – In an effort to add more balance to its diverse electric generation portfolio, the Grand River Dam Authority will soon be utilizing even more Oklahoma wind power.

At its August meeting, the GRDA Board of Directors approved a new wind power purchase agreement that will allow the Authority to receive 100 megawatts (MW) of wind-generated electricity from Apex Clean Energy’s Kay Wind project, located in Kay County, Oklahoma. Apex is building the wind farm near the communities of Newkirk and Peckham, with completion scheduled for some time in 2015.

GRDA estimates this purchase will save its customers about $50 million over the project’s lifetime.

“We’re excited about the opportunity to add more renewable energy to our portfolio,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer/Director of Investments Dan Sullivan. “Additional wind power is a key point in our long-term generation plan and this agreement allows us to use Oklahoma wind to generate long-term benefits for Oklahoma ratepayers. Oklahoma wind provides a greater balance and diversity in the generation portfolio and can equal lower costs.”

“We are seeing an increased interest in renewable power from several of our industrial and commercial customers, and we are excited to use Oklahoma resources to service this growing demand.”

Under another agreement, GRDA is already receiving 48 MW of wind power from the Canadian Hills Wind Farm near El Reno, Oklahoma, which Apex developed and built. “We could not be more pleased to be working with GRDA on another renewable energy purchase,” said Mark Goodwin, president of Apex.

“With this agreement, GRDA will use one of Oklahoma’s most abundant natural resources, the wind, to reduce energy costs for Oklahoma residents and businesses, while generating revenue for Oklahoma communities and Oklahoma farmers.” The Kay Wind project is expected to generate about $53 million in local tax revenue and about $48 million in local landowner payments over the project’s lifetime, in addition to over $228 million in local expenditures on goods and services throughout construction and operation. It is also anticipated to create or help maintain 218 local jobs during the construction phase and 45 local jobs to operate the wind farm throughout its lifetime.”

Landowner Bob Scott, who lives in Kay County and has signed a lease with Apex to put turbines on his property said, “The Kay Wind project will create a new and stable source of income for my family for many years to come. I will still farm the land around the wind turbines without greatly impacting crop yields, and the turbine payments will provide welcome security for my family when farming conditions are less favorable. This project will provide drought-proof income that will benefit the entire community and help keep the farming tradition alive in Kay County.”

GRDA also has agreements in place with TradeWind Energy, Inc for 235 MW of wind power from two other Oklahoma wind farms. With these recent agreements, wind power now accounts for well over 15 percent of GRDA’s total generation capability. In 2012, wind accounted for roughly 3 percent of GRDA’s total generation capacity.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable electricity touches75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

# # #

Initial pricing to take place in October … GRDA bond issue gets oversight council approval

Vinita – The Grand River Dam Authority’s $440 million bond issue, scheduled take place later this fall, now has the approval of the Oklahoma Council of Bond Oversight.

The Grand River Dam Authority’s Grand River Energy Center (GREC), located just east of Chouteau, Oklahoma. GRDA will use funds from an upcoming bond issue to build a new, combined cycle gas plant adjacent to the existing coal units at this site. Last week, the Oklahoma Council of Bond Oversight gave its approval to that GRDA bond issue.

The Grand River Dam Authority’s Grand River Energy Center (GREC), located just east of Chouteau, Oklahoma. GRDA will use funds from an upcoming bond issue to build a new, combined cycle gas plant adjacent to the existing coal units at this site. Last week, the Oklahoma Council of Bond Oversight gave its approval to that GRDA bond issue.

On Thursday, August 28, the five-member council, responsible for the review of all financing requests by state agencies, gave its unanimous approval to GRDA’s bond plans following a presentation by GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan and Chief Financial Officer Carolyn Dougherty. The meeting took place at the State Bond Advisor’s Office in Oklahoma City.

“This is good news and was an important next step toward what we expect to be a very successful bond issue,” said Sullivan. “We appreciate the confidence the council showed in GRDA by giving this approval and we look forward to moving forward.”

According to Sullivan, a remaining step would be a possible credit rating upgrade. Last week, GRDA hosted all three major rating agencies, Fitch, Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s, for overviews of GRDA facilities and future plans.

In March 2013, Moody’s Investor Services affirmed its “A2” rating for GRDA and moved its outlook from “stable” to “positive” status. In April 2014, Standard and Poor’s Rating Service took similar action; reaffirming GRDA’s “A” rating and moving the outlook from stable to positive. According to Sullivan, these revisions can mean lower interest rates when bonds are issued; something that will benefit GRDA’s ratepayers. Higher ratings can also enable GRDA to save money on natural gas hedging in the future.

GRDA will use the majority of the proceeds from this bond issue to construct a new, combined-cycle gas fired generation plant at the Grand River Energy Center (formerly Coal Fired Complex) in Chouteau, Oklahoma. Other proceeds will be used to complete emissions control upgrades on Unit 2, one of the existing coal fired generators at the facility.

All three rating agencies: Moody’s, S&P and Fitch will update their GRDA ratings in mid-September prior to the bond issue. Sullivan said GRDA expects the initial pricing of the bond issue to take place in early October.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable; electricity serves nearly 500,000 homes in Oklahoma and stretches into 75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to Oklahoma taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

 

# # #

With Labor Day Weekend approaching … GRDA Police offers safety tips for boaters, PWC operators

Boaters make their way across Grand Lake during a recent summer weekend. If your Labor Day holiday plans include a visit to Grand or Hudson lakes, the Grand River Dam Authority Police Department is encouraging you to boat safe, smart and sober.

Boaters make their way across Grand Lake during a recent summer weekend. If your Labor Day holiday plans include a visit to Grand or Hudson lakes, the Grand River Dam Authority Police Department is encouraging you to boat safe, smart and sober.

Langley – The arrival of the long Labor Day weekend marks an opportunity for many lake enthusiasts to return to the waters of Grand and Hudson lakes for at least one more summer outing. If your plans include a lake visit to Grand River Dam Authority waters, the GRDA Police Department reminds you to keep these safe boating tips in mind:

• DO wear a life jacket. They float. You don’t.

• DO know the water and the environment you will be boating on.

― Please note: Due to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) mandated drawdown of Grand Lake; the lake’s elevation is expected to be at 741’ feet during Labor Day weekend. Please take extra precautions when boating as the lake will be approximately three feet lower than the normal boating season elevation of 744’.

• DO keep a good lookout while underway.

• DO shut your engines off when people are in the water near your boat.

• DO observe the nautical “rules of the road.”

• DO check the weather forecast before getting underway.

• DO keep a balanced load and trim boat.

• DON’T overload your boat.

• DON’T ride on the gunwale, bow, seat backs or any other place that is not designed for sitting.

• Finally, DON’T DRINK AND BOAT. (The majority of lake accidents are alcohol-related).

For those planning on hitting the water on a personal watercraft (PWC), the GRDA Police also offers these important safety tips:

• Don’t ride tired: PWC operation requires a real sense of balance. Tired operators do not have as much balance, which means less controlled operation.

• Watch the weight: Don’t carry more passengers or weight than is recommended in your PWC’s owner manual. The heavier the load, the harder it is to handle and turn your PWC.

• Watch out for others: Because lake traffic changes constantly, riders have to be very aware of their surroundings at all times.

• Know what the craft is capable of: Just because you have ridden a PWC before, don’t assume they are all the same. For the most part, they are very similar, but riders must be educated about the specifics of the craft they are operating.

• Know where you are: It is very important to know your location on the water. Are you near hazards such as rocks, buoys or sandbars? Are you in a place that is popular with skiers? Even though PWCs are designed to operate in shallow waters, it is important to remember that shallow water can become no water in a hurry. Avoid such areas.

• Never drink and ride: PWC operation requires clear thinking, quick decisions, the ability to focus, depth perception, ability to judge speed and distance and ability to track moving objects. Alcohol impairs all these abilities while also affecting balance. Oftentimes, PWC injuries occur when people fall into the water and are too inebriated to climb back on board.

• Watch your speed: Many PWC accidents are a result of excessive speed. PWC operators must match their speed to their skills. Don’t be overmatched by traveling too fast.

Finally, the GRDA Police reminds boaters that Oklahoma boating laws and GRDA lake rules require children age 12 and under to wear a United States Coast Guard-approved flotation device on any moving boat less than 26 feet in length. Also, all vessels must carry approved personal flotation devices (PFDs) for each person on board. However, GRDA urges all boaters to set a good example for the children – and increase your chances of survival in an accident – by wearing your lifejacket at all times.

For more information on the GRDA Police Department or information on how an officer can assist you, contact the department at (918) 256 0911, or visit online at grda.com. If you need assistance from your boat, radio GRDA Police on Marine Band 16.

 

# # #

Notice to the Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 58 feet across a cove, which measures 110 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: Joe Landon

Location: Drowning Creek

Lake Address: 3254 CR 356, Eucha, Ok

Legal Description: Township 23N, Range 22E, Section 3

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext 4432.

GRDA Board takes steps for upcoming bond issue

An artist’s rendering of the new GRDA Unit 3, combined with an aerial photo of the existing Grand River Energy Center (east of Chouteau, Oklahoma). Proceeds from a bond issue, scheduled for later this fall, will be used to construct the combined cycle gas plant, which will be powered by Oklahoma natural gas. At its August meeting, the GRDA Board approved several items related to the coming bond issue.

An artist’s rendering of the new GRDA Unit 3, combined with an aerial photo of the existing Grand River Energy Center (east of Chouteau, Oklahoma). Proceeds from a bond issue, scheduled for later this fall, will be used to construct the combined cycle gas plant, which will be powered by Oklahoma natural gas. At its August meeting, the GRDA Board approved several items related to the coming bond issue.

Vinita – The Grand River Dam Authority took another major step towards the realization of its long-term generation plan last week when its board of directors approved much of the preliminary steps needed for a $450 million bond issue, which will likely take place later this fall.

GRDA will use the majority of the proceeds from this bond issue to construct a new, combined-cycle gas fired generation plant at the Grand River Energy Center (formerly Coal Fired Complex). Other proceeds will be used to complete emissions control upgrades on Unit 2, one of the existing coal fired generators at the facility.

A combined cycle unit produces electricity in two ways: natural gas is first used to fuel a combustion turbine-generator and then heat from that process will be recaptured and used to produce steam to turn another steam turbine-generator.

The new unit, designed by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas, will be powered by Oklahoma natural gas and will be the first of its kind in the western hemisphere. Once complete, it will have the potential to be the most efficient combined cycle unit in the United States.

“This is an exciting time for GRDA, as it prepares for this new bond issue and the construction of this new unit,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer/Director of Investments Dan Sullivan. “I want to commend our board for making these decisions and allowing GRDA to move forward with this very important step towards our future goals.”

At its August meeting, the board approved the necessary resolutions related to the bond issue, which included the preliminary official statement and bond purchase agreement. GRDA expects the issue to take place in October.

Historically, the Authority’s bonds are very popular in Oklahoma. Prior to August 2012, when GRDA paid off $200 million in bonds, Oklahoma residents in 76 of 77 counties held a combined $272 million worth of GRDA bonds. A $550 million GRDA bond issue in 2008 was, at the time, the state’s largest, in terms of retail sales to in-state investors.

“These bonds are very well received by Oklahomans,” said Sullivan, “and we view that as a vote of confidence in GRDA and the important mission it fulfills everyday for the state. We anticipate the same kind of reception for this next issue.”

In March 2013, Moody’s Investor Services affirmed its “A2” rating for GRDA and moved its outlook from “stable” to “positive” status. In April 2014, Standard and Poor’s Rating Service took similar action; reaffirming GRDA’s “A” rating and moving the outlook from stable to positive. According to Sullivan, these revisions can mean lower interest rates when bonds are issued; something that will benefit GRDA’s ratepayers. Higher ratings can also enable GRDA to save money on natural gas hedging in the future.

All three rating agencies: Moody’s, S&P and Fitch will update their GRDA ratings prior to the bond issue later this year.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable; electricity serves nearly 500,000 homes in Oklahoma and stretches into 75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to Oklahoma taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

 

# # #

Grand Lake drawdown is mandated by FERC

In 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued the Grand River Dam Authority a new license to operate the Pensacola Dam and Grand Lake. In 1996, an amendment to that license required GRDA to begin holding Grand Lake at different elevations throughout the year.

In early August, this license requires GRDA to begin lowering the elevation of Grand Lake to meet a 741’ mark by September 1 to complete a millet seeding project around the newly-exposed mudflat areas of the lake. The lake is then held at this elevation until mid-October, when GRDA is required to begin raising the elevation to 742’ by month’s end. The license then calls for the lake to be held at 742’ through the winter and spring months, before GRDA begins raising it to meet a 744’ mark on June 1. It is then held at this elevation again, until August 1.

This annual lake drawdown is mandated by FERC under the terms of GRDA’s hydroelectric license to operate Pensacola Dam. Although the millet seeding is not taking place this year (and has not since 2011) FERC still requires the drawdown.

In both 2012 and 2013, GRDA asked for a variance from the rule curve to suspend the drawdown. FERC did grant the variance in 2012, but not in 2013. The City of Miami has indicated to FERC that suspending the drawdown might increase the risk of flooding in the community. GRDA continues to seek a long term solution that will balance the interest and concerns of all lake users while also giving the organization greater operational control of Pensacola Dam.

The graph illustrates the elevation requirements and schedule mandated by GRDA’s operating license for Pensacola Dam/ Grand Lake, as issued by FERC.

Grand Lake Seasonal Elevations.

Grand Lake Seasonal Elevations.

GRDA reminds lake users of issues, tips related to zebra mussels

Langley – A growing number of reports of zebra mussels in Grand Lake waters is prompting the Grand River Dam Authority to remind lake users and residents of the issues related to the small, non-indigenous mollusks.

Dubbed “public enemy number one” on the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) aquatic nuisance species list, zebra mussels have been a problem for the nation’s waterways since at least 1988. That was the year they were first discovered in the Great Lakes region. Most believe they were inadvertently transported across the Atlantic Ocean in the ballast water of ocean liners, traveling from the Black and Caspian seas region. Soon after, they began to spread across the Midwest, working their way down the Mississippi River into other waterways.

They gained they “nuisance” label because of their ability to attach to almost any solid surface underway (the only freshwater mussel to do so) and their rapid reproduction; females can lay over one million eggs in a spawning season. Across waterways with large infestations, the mussels block intake pipes, clog pumps, colonize on docks and cause other problems for underwater structures. Because they are “filter feeders” and non-native, they can also disrupt the water’s natural food chain.

Although mussels have been found in Grand and Hudson lakes in past years, a large infestation has never been confirmed. Still, recent reports of mussel sightings from areas around the lake are a cause for some concern and have led the GRDA to make lake users aware of the growing presence and remind them of the steps that can be taken to prevent their spread.

“Unfortunately, history has shown that once they are in a body of water, there is really no effective means to remove them, and it’s possible that we will see more and more of them in the years ahead,” said GRDA Communications Director Justin Alberty. “However, steps can be taken to prevent their spread, so we want the public to be aware of their presence and some of the issues surrounding the mussels.”

GRDA has followed the zebra mussel issue for over 20 years. Since the early 1990s, the Authority has been part of a state-wide task force that has monitored Oklahoma waterways for the mussels’ presence. In early 2004, after the establishment of the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department, GRDA ramped up those efforts with special monitoring stations in Grand and Hudson lakes.

“We appreciate the public’s cooperation in not only following these important tips that can help slow the zebra mussels from spreading, but also are very appreciative of those who have called to report sightings around the lakes,” said Alberty.

In 2008, the GRDA partnered with Oklahoma Aquarium at Jenks to produce a permanent display to educate aquarium visitors about zebra mussels. The department has also worked closely with organizations like the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary and the United States Army Corps of Engineers to spread the word to lake users.

To do your part to help slow the spread of zebra mussels, follow these important steps:

• Boats should not be left in the water for extended periods of time. With regular use, engine heat should keep mussels from colonizing inside most engine parts.

• Always drain the bilge water, live wells and bait buckets.

• Inspect the boat and trailer immediately upon leaving the water.

• Scrape off any mussels found. Do NOT return them to the water.

• If possible, dry the boat and trailer for at least a week before entering another waterway.

• Wash boat parts and accessories that contact the water using hot water (at least 140 degrees Fahrenheit), a ten percent solution of household chlorine bleach or a hot saltwater solution. Do not wash the boat at the ramp where these solutions could pollute the water. Always finish with a clean rinse.

For more information on zebra mussels or to report a possible sighting in GRDA waters, contact the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department at (918) 782 4726.

# # #

Due to temporary lighting problem, GRDA asking drivers to exercise caution on dam

Langley – Due to a temporary problem with the lighting across Pensacola Dam, the Grand River Dam Authority is asking drivers to exercise extra caution while crossing the dam at nighttime.

On Thursday (July 10), GRDA crews discovered a fault in the high voltage cable used to power the dam’s light poles. Lightning, associated with the storms that blew through the area on Thursday, likely contributed to the fault and, as a result, a portion of the electric cable will need to be replaced. However, until that work is completed, the lights across the dam will be out of service.

Temporary digital signage was scheduled to be installed at both ends of the dam on Friday (July 11), to remind drivers to take precautions. GRDA is currently working to secure new cabling and schedule the necessary repairs.

 

# # #

GRDA’s Sullivan elected to full term on national public power board

GRDA Chief Executive Officer/Director of Investments Dan Sullivan. On June 17, Sullivan was elected to a three-year term on the American Public Power Association (APPA) Board of Directors.

GRDA Chief Executive Officer/Director of Investments Dan Sullivan. On June 17, Sullivan was elected to a three-year term on the American Public Power Association (APPA) Board of Directors.

Denver – With his recent election to a full term on the American Public Power Association (APPA) Board of Directors, Grand River Dam Authority Chief Executive Officer/Director of Investments Dan Sullivan said he is looking forward to the opportunity to continue representing Oklahoma public power on the national level.

“I appreciate the opportunity to continue serving GRDA, our customers, our state and public power,” said Sullivan. “The electric utility industry is facing many important issues right now and I look forward to working with other directors from across the country to help secure public power’s continued place in the industry.”

Sullivan initially joined the board in October 2013, to fill a position vacated when former Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority General Manger Cindy Holman retired. On Tuesday (June 17), during APPA’s National Convention in Denver, Colorado, he was elected to the full, three-year term.

“GRDA has been an active member of the APPA for many years and understands the many benefits it can offer not only public power utilities, but also the consumers who depend on those utilities for low-cost, reliable power,” said Sullivan.

Already involved in national public power issues, he has been a member of the APPA CEO Climate Change and Generation Policy Task Force since July 2012. That group was formed in 2006 to assist APPA in developing policy positions on climate change. Last year, it expanded its mission to address the many environmental regulations impacting the nation’s public power utilities. He is also a member of the Large Public Power Council (LPPC) Board of Directors. The LPPC is comprised of 26 of the nation’s largest publicly owned electric utilities.

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., APPA is the service organization for the nation’s more than 2,000 publicly-owned electric utilities. Combined, these utilities serve more than 46 million Americans. APPA was created in 1940 as a nonprofit, non-partisan organization to advance the public policy interests of its members and public power consumers.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Directly or indirectly, GRDA’s low-cost, reliable; electricity serves nearly 500,000 homes in Oklahoma and stretches into 75 of 77 counties in the state. At no cost to Oklahoma taxpayers, GRDA also manages 70,000 surface acres of lakes in the state, including Grand Lake, Lake Hudson and the W.R. Holway Reservoir. Today, GRDA’s 500 employees continue to produce the same “power for progress” that has benefited the state for 75 years.

 

# # #

Notice to the Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please take notice that The Grand River Dam Authority has received an application for a private dock requiring directional bearing. Such directional bearing relates to a dock application for a private dock which if approved shall extend 105 feet across a cove, which measures 156 feet across from 745 feet mean sea level to 745 feet mean sea level on the nearest opposite shoreline.

Applicant: John Smith & Sharon Bohannan

Location: Courthouse Hollow

Lake Address: 60201 E 320 Rd. Grove Ok 74006

Legal Description: Township 24N, Range 23E, Section 23

Project: Private Dock

If you would like to request additional information, please address your request to the Grand River Dam Authority Administration Headquarters, P. O. Box 409, Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 or call (918) 256-5545 ext 4432.

Tuesday, June 17 update: Geese identified as bacteria source, beach remains closed

Langley – Results from the water samples taken at the Grand Lake State Park (Bernice) swimming area of Grand Lake last week are pointing towards geese as the culprit for the elevated levels of E.Coli and Enterococci. Those elevated bacteria levels led the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department to close the swim beach on Tuesday, June 3.

On Monday (June 16), GRDA and ODEQ announced that an independent testing laboratory in Tennessee had confirmed that the high levels of bacteria contained DNA from geese and perhaps another avian source. The results also gave the agencies confidence that the bacteria was not from human or cattle sources.

Because that particular stretch of shoreline is a favorite nesting area for a large population of geese, recent heavy rains in the area likely led to geese waste being washed into the water, leading to the elevated bacteria levels.

“When this swim area was initially closed in early June, the primary goal was to determine the source,” said GRDA Communications Director Justin Alberty. “These results show this to be a naturally occurring event and not anything man-made.”

Officials continue to monitor the situation and GRDA continues to gather daily samples from the swim beach area. Following a reassessment on Tuesday, June 17, officials made the decision to keep the swim area closed until the bacteria levels return to a safe range.

Throughout the two-week beach closure, GRDA has continued to stress that the incident is isolated to the swim beach area at Grand Lake State Park, and all other areas of Grand Lake remain open.

“Grand Lake is large, with plenty of other locations for swimming and access. This closure impacts a very small stretch of 1,300 miles of shoreline.” said Alberty. “Of course, we encourage the public to practice common sense and follow safe practices when swimming but we also remind everyone that the closure is for this one beach area only.”

 

# # #

Floodwater release bulletin

At 3:00PM on Thursday, June 12:

o Grand Lake elevation was 745.15. Daily target elevation for June 12 is 744 feet.
o At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 243 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
o Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,326 cfs of water through generation.
o Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 13,569 cfs.
o Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 14,211 cfs.

o Lake Hudson elevation was 619.61 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
o One (1) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 434 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
o Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 17,550 cfs of water through generation.
o Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 17,984 cfs.
o Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 13,885 cfs.

# # #

Floodwater release bulletin

At 3:00PM on Wednesday, June 11:

o Grand Lake elevation was 745.21. Daily target elevation for June 11 is 744 feet.
o At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 2,968 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
o Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,496 cfs of water through generation.
o Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 16,464 cfs.
o Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 12,616 cfs.

o Lake Hudson elevation was 620.12 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
o One (1) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 440 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
o Three (3) units were online at Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse releasing 24,570 cfs of water through generation.
o Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 25,010 cfs.
o Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 16,810 cfs.

With the heavy inflows into the Grand River system during the last week, five floodgates were open earlier this week at the east spillway of Pensacola Dam. Wednesday afternoon at the direction of the Corps of Engineers, two floodgates remain open (photo by Katie Robbins).

With the heavy inflows into the Grand River system during the last week, five floodgates were open earlier this week at the east spillway of Pensacola Dam. Wednesday afternoon at the direction of the Corps of Engineers, two floodgates remain open (photo by Katie Robbins).

# # #