GRDA Police shares information, tips to help prevent the “station wagon” effect

Virtually all boating-related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning incidents are preventable and that is why the Grand River Dam Authority Police Department is educating boaters on the “station wagon effect.” Good information and the right precautions can lead to safe, enjoyable outings.

Virtually all boating-related carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning incidents are preventable and that is why the Grand River Dam Authority Police Department is educating boaters on the “station wagon effect.” Good information and the right precautions can lead to safe, enjoyable outings.

“Virtually all CO poisonings are preventable.”

With boating season rapidly approaching, the Grand River Dam Authority Police Department is once again sharing information about carbon monoxide (CO), the “station wagon” effect and the possible dangers it can present to boaters.

“It is certainly something boaters need to be aware of,” said GRDA Chief of Law Enforcement/Lake Operations Brian Edwards. “The station wagon effect is essentially when fumes from a boat’s exhaust travel back into the boat or accumulate in an area near the boat where swimmers may be in the water.”

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CO can build up near the rear swim deck or water platform of larger boats equipped with generators that vent towards the rear. CO that builds up in the air space below the stern deck or around the swim deck can prove deadly, within a few seconds of exposure. Boats traveling at slow speeds, or idling in the water, can cause CO to build up in the cabin, cockpit, bridge, aft deck or even open areas of the boat. Wind blowing in from the back of the boat can also increase the chances of a CO buildup. Boats operating at a high bow angle, or boats that are improperly or heavily loaded, or boats with an opening that draws in exhaust, can also lead to CO buildup.

“However, the good news is that virtually all CO poisonings are preventable,” said Edwards, “but it’s important to know the facts so that you can protect yourself and your passengers. Then you can go enjoy your time on the water.”

To help educate boaters, GRDA is sharing the following information:

  • Install approved, battery operated CO detectors in each accommodation area of your boat. Test them before each trip out.
  • Properly install and maintain all fuel-burning engines and appliances on your boat.
  • Have your boat’s engine and exhaust systems maintained and inspected on a regular basis by experienced and trained mechanics.
  • Even in inclement weather, keep forward facing hatches open to allow fresh air to circulate in accommodation spaces. When possible, operate the boat so that prevailing winds will help dissipate exhaust.
  • Never swim and play in areas where engines vent their exhaust
  • Watch children closely when they play on rear swim decks or water platforms
  • Never block exhaust outlets. Blocking outlets can cause CO to build up in the cabin and cockpit areas, even when hatches, windows, portholes and doors are closed.
  • Dock, beach or anchor your boat at least 20 feet from the nearest boat that is a running a generator or engine. Exhaust from a nearby vessel can send CO into the cabin or cockpit of a boat.

It is also important to educate all your boat passengers about the following signs and symptoms of CO poisoning:

  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Fatigue
  • Seizures
  • Dizziness or loss of consciousness
  • Nausea

Remember, CO cannot be seen or smelled. If anyone has these symptoms, move them to fresh air immediately and investigate the cause and take corrective action. Seek medical attention if necessary.

 “Taking these precautions and educating yourself on the facts of carbon monoxide and boating can go a long way in helping to keep boaters safe,” said Edwards. He added that the public can also find even more information about CO and boating on the United States Coast Guard’s boating information site at http://www.uscgboating.org/recreational-boaters/carbon-monoxide.php.

Also, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website http://www.cdc.gov/co/boating.htm for more information.

For more information on the GRDA Police Department or information on how an officer can assist you, contact the department at (918) 256 0911, or visit online at www.grda.com.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency. 

Floodwater release bulletin

At 12PM on Friday, May 20:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 745.14 feet. Daily target elevation for May 20 is 743.27 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) east floodgate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 194 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 14,020 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 14,214 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 10,661 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 619.58 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,590 cfs of water through generation.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 14,795 cfs.

Floodwater release bulletin

At 3:30PM on Wednesday, May 18:

• Grand Lake elevation was 745.08 feet. Daily target elevation for May 18 is 743.13 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, seven (7) east floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 10,024 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,819 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 23,843 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 44,121 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 619.10 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
• One unit was online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 8,370 cfs of water through generation.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 26,660 cfs.

Governor signs Senate Bill 1388 … OSRC, GRDA merger to be finalized

Grand River Dam Authority Project/Research Director Rich Zamor, Ph.D., works inside the GRDA Ecosystems Water Quality Research Laboratory in Langley, Oklahoma. With the merger between GRDA and the Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission (OSRC) effective on July 1, GRDA’s stewardship mission for the waters of the Grand River System will also expand to the Illinois River in Northeast Oklahoma.

Grand River Dam Authority Project/Research Director Rich Zamor, Ph.D., works inside the GRDA Ecosystems Water Quality Research Laboratory in Langley, Oklahoma. With the merger between GRDA and the Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission (OSRC) effective on July 1, GRDA’s stewardship mission for the waters of the Grand River System will also expand to the Illinois River in Northeast Oklahoma.

Vinita – The Grand River Dam Authority is viewing its merger with the Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission (OSRC) as an opportunity to expand on the important work OSRC has advanced, while also continuing its own stewardship responsibilities in Oklahoma.

On Wednesday, May 11, Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin signed Senate Bill 1388 into law. That bill calls for GRDA to assume the duties and responsibilities of OSRC on July 1, 2016. It also gives GRDA the power to set a new fee structure for recreational use, both along the Illinois River and in the spillway area below Pensacola Dam.

The OSRC was established by the legislature in 1977 to protect, enhance and preserve the Illinois River and its tributaries, Barren Fork Creek and Flint Creek. However, the agency — which receives roughly half of its funding from state appropriations — has faced many budget cuts in recent years, making it difficult for it to complete its mission. GRDA, a non-appropriated state agency — primarily funded by revenues from the sale of electricity — will absorb OSRC’s operations, employees and assets, as well as the stewardship mission.

“The Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission has been dying a slow death of a thousand cuts,” said OSRC Administrator Ed Fite. “The OSRC was once afloat, renowned as the most-efficient environmental agency of state government, but in recent years has barely been treading water.”

While the legislation ends appropriations for the OSRC and shifts those costs to GRDA, the mission of the OSRC will continue, said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan.

“This merger allows the important work of caring for the scenic rivers to go on,” said Sullivan. “GRDA’s stewardship responsibilities for the Grand River system have always been similar and we feel like combining the experience and expertise of both OSRC and GRDA can only benefit all of these waters.”

Sullivan also noted that Fite’s 30-plus years of experience in Oklahoma water quality issues will be a great benefit to the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department.

“This merger will give him the opportunity and support to focus on water quality issues, instead of other budgetary or administrative issues,” said Sullivan. “We’re pleased he will continue as a member of the GRDA team.”

For Fite, that means continuing on with the cause that first launched the OSRC nearly four decades ago.

“Preservation and protection of scenic rivers is a cause that has no end point,” he said. “There is no point at which Oklahomans may say our work is finished.”

While some aspects of the merger may move slowly, including any new fee structures, Sullivan said by the July 1 effective date, GRDA will be ready to fully assume its new responsibilities along the Illinois River.

“We look forward to welcoming our new team members and continuing our efforts to care for these important Oklahoma natural resources,” said Sullivan.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

 Since 2010, it has operated a state-of-the-art water quality research laboratory, inside its Ecosystems and Education Center in Langley. Today, the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department continues to work with the public, other state and federal resource agencies, as well as agencies across a four-state area, to preserve and protect the waters of the Grand River watershed.

GRDA offer not entertained by NE Electric Trustee Board

Vinita – An offer by the Grand River Dam Authority, which could continue its longstanding partnership with Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative, was not entertained by the cooperative’s board of trustees.

GRDA Board Chairman Ed Townsend, Director Pete Churchwell and Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan were prepared to make the offer during a meeting of the trustees on Thursday, May 12, in Vinita. Though GRDA has continuously supplied the cooperative’s wholesale electricity since 1946, Northeast trustees voted to pass on the GRDA deal before they were presented with the details.

GRDA intended to offer Northeast $8.2 million cash upon approval of the agreement to purchase the cooperative’s transmission lines, radial lines and electric substation transformers, while also agreeing to serve all of Northeast’s current delivery points. GRDA would assume responsibility for the transmission assets and make an estimated investment of $15-$20 million to upgrade the transmission system. According to Sullivan, GRDA also offered its “most competitive rate” which would have saved the cooperative approximately $700 thousand annually.

“This is a 15-year deal that would give Northeast one service provider while also giving them access to the best energy costs from the Southwest Power Pool market,” said Sullivan. “It would also give them access to our diverse generation portfolio going forward, as well as continue the synergies between our organizations that have helped boost economic development and water quality in the Grand Lake area as part of a relationship that goes back 70 years.”

Former Oklahoma State Senator Rick Littlefield, who owns a business on Grand Lake, said he was disappointed by the news.

“As a Northeast member, I am deeply disappointed that a decision of this magnitude, which could adversely impact the Grand Lake area and cooperative members, was made without giving the membership a chance to provide input first,” said Littlefield.

At the meeting, Northeast trustees did advise the GRDA group that it would entertain an offer to serve half of the cooperative’s system.  

“We’re certainly disappointed that they did not entertain what GRDA feels is a very beneficial offer for their membership,” said Townsend. “However, we do appreciate the opportunity to explore serving half of their load and we will put together an offer to do that, in hopes of continuing this partnership that has benefited both organizations, their members and the Grand Lake region since the 1940s.”

 

Has your dock’s electric system been inspected?

As the weather heats up and our minds return to summer days spent dockside, the Grand River Dam Authority wants to remind dock owners to have their dock’s electric systems inspected on a regular basis.

As the weather heats up and our minds return to summer days spent dockside, the Grand River Dam Authority wants to remind dock owners to have their dock’s electric systems inspected on a regular basis.

Langley – With warmer weather, the end of the school year and the approach of summer all upon us, many people are not only spending more time in the water but also more time on their docks. With that in mind, the Grand River Dam Authority wants to remind all dock owners of the importance of maintaining compliance with dock electrical systems to ensure they are in proper working order.

The unfortunate truth is that a faulty dock electric system can be very dangerous, and may even prove fatal, for those in the water near the docks or those in contact with the dock. System defects can cause electric current to be discharged into the water or the metal components of the dock. That is why GRDA-issued dock permits require you to have your dock inspected by a licensed professional electrician.

Those inspections cover many areas of the dock, including proper grounding, conduit, breakers, wiring, dock receptacles, dock metal works and electrical service boxes.

“We can’t stress enough just how important it is to have your dock’s electric system inspected

The conduit, the grounding rod, the outlets and all features of a dock’s electric system should be inspected on a regular basis, by a Oklahoma licensed electrical contractor.

The conduit, the grounding rod, the outlets and all features of a dock’s electric system should be inspected on a regular basis, by a Oklahoma licensed electrical contractor.

and in proper working order,” said GRDA Corporate Communications Director Justin Alberty. “Just as you inspect your boat and get it ready for the boating season, you should do the same thing with your dock’s electric system. Please take that precaution if you plan on spending time on your dock this summer.”

GRDA’s application for dock permits requires any dock wired for electricity to have a completed electrical certification form signed by an Oklahoma Licensed Electrical contractor before a final permit will be approved. Dock standards also require docks to have an electrical disconnect clearly identified and located above the high water mark. Also, any residential dock that has electrical service must adhere to the regulations set forth in the National Electric Code. Finally, any docks constructed or modified, relocated or transferred, are required to provide GRDA with a certificate signed by an Oklahoma licensed electric contractor, showing compliance with all laws, regulations and codes regarding electrical systems and wiring.

“There are standards in place for new and modified docks and transfers,” said Alberty. “However, all dock owners should have a regular inspection due to the simple wear and tear and weathering that occurs over the years.”

For more information on dock permits or other GRDA lake permitting issues, contact Janet DelliSanti in GRDA’s lake permitting offices at (918) 256-0852 or stop by the GRDA Ecosystems and Education Center in Langley.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

Floodwater release bulletin

At 10AM on Monday, May 2:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 745.01 feet. Daily target elevation for May 2 is 742.07 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) east spillway gate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 187 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,480 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgate and generation totaled 13,667 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 13,709 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 619.62 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • No floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,590  cfs of water through generation.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 16,239 cfs.

GRDA, MHPSA, Port of Catoosa mark turbine’s arrival

First of its kind in the western hemisphere …

Steve Spears, a member of the Grand River Dam Authority Board of Directors and city manager in the GRDA customer community of Cushing, Oklahoma, addresses the crowd at an event to recognize the arrival of GRDA’s new gas turbine. Manufactured by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, the new turbine will spin at the heart of GRDA’s new Unit 3 combined cycle gas generation plant, currently under construction at the Grand River Energy Center (Chouteau, Oklahoma). The first of its kind in the western hemisphere, the turbine was shipped to GRDA via the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. The event was held at the port on Wednesday, February 25.

Steve Spears, a member of the Grand River Dam Authority Board of Directors and city manager in the GRDA customer community of Cushing, Oklahoma, addresses the crowd at an event to recognize the arrival of GRDA’s new gas turbine. Manufactured by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, the new turbine will spin at the heart of GRDA’s new Unit 3 combined cycle gas generation plant, currently under construction at the Grand River Energy Center (Chouteau, Oklahoma). The first of its kind in the western hemisphere, the turbine was shipped to GRDA via the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. The event was held at the port on Wednesday, February 25.

Catoosa — With the help of Oklahoma’s robust inland waterway system, one of the most efficient electric generators in the nation will soon be part of the Grand River Dam Authority’s new Unit 3 combined cycle gas plant.

On Tuesday, February 23, GRDA’s new gas turbine, which will spin at the heart of the new Unit 3, arrived at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. Manufactured by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, the M501J model turbine is the first of its kind to be deployed in the western hemisphere.

“We’re very excited to bring this highly-efficient turbine into our generation portfolio,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “The construction of Unit 3, and the efficiencies it will bring, is a way to honor the long-term commitment our customers have made in GRDA.”

The M501J has the capability to produce 327 megawatts (MW) of electricity. Onsite at GRDA, it will be

GRDA Assistant General Manager of Fuel and Generation Projects Charles Barney (left) visits with Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett following an event to recognize the arrival of GRDA’s new gas turbine at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. The turbine, an M501J model constructed by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, will spin at the heart of GRDA’s new combined cycle gas generation plant, currently under construction near Chouteau, Oklahoma. GRDA’s M501J is the first of its kind in the western hemisphere.

GRDA Assistant General Manager of Fuel and Generation Projects Charles Barney (left) visits with Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett following an event to recognize the arrival of GRDA’s new gas turbine at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. The turbine, an M501J model constructed by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, will spin at the heart of GRDA’s new combined cycle gas generation plant, currently under construction near Chouteau, Oklahoma. GRDA’s M501J is the first of its kind in the western hemisphere.

fueled by Oklahoma natural gas and operate as part of a combined cycle generator, in concert with a steam turbine, also manufactured by Mitsubishi. Together, the turbines will give GRDA Unit 3 the capability to produced 495 MW.

“We at Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems are proud to be an integral part of GRDA’s expansion at the Grand River Energy Center,” said Dave Walsh, President and CEO of MHPSA. “The M501J, gas turbine offers the largest output and the highest performance among all gas turbines in commercial operation. When commissioned at Unit 3 in 2017, this turbine will be the 28th J-Series to go commercial, as well as the largest and most efficient single unit in operation in the western hemisphere.”

Grand River Dam Authority Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan poses in front of GRDA’s new gas generation turbine. Manufactured by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, the new turbine (the first of its kind in the western hemisphere) was shipped to Oklahoma via the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. It arrived at the port earlier this week and will soon be headed to its permanent home at GRDA’s Grand River Energy Center, east of Chouteau, Oklahoma.

Grand River Dam Authority Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan poses in front of GRDA’s new gas generation turbine. Manufactured by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas (MHPSA) in Savannah, Georgia, the new turbine (the first of its kind in the western hemisphere) was shipped to Oklahoma via the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa. It arrived at the port earlier this week and will soon be headed to its permanent home at GRDA’s Grand River Energy Center, east of Chouteau, Oklahoma.

Sullivan also recognized that bringing the turbine, and many other components for the new facility, would have been difficult without the existence of the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa.

“These are tremendous assets for Oklahoma,” said Sullivan. “For GRDA, the waterway and port provided the only economical way to transport this turbine to Oklahoma.”

The Tulsa Port of Catoosa is one of the largest and most-inland ports in the country.

“The waterway is an integral part of the economy and transportation network for our region,” said Bob Portiss, Port Director, Tulsa Port of Catoosa. “We are proud that the MKARNS and the capabilities of the Port of Catoosa were so beneficial to bringing this oversize cargo to our friends at GRDA.”

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

# # #

GRDA to drop Holway Reservoir for routine inspection

Salina – In order to complete a mandatory inspection and collect important data along the canal and fore bay structure, as well as the penstocks and reservoir rim, the Grand River Dam Authority is informing the public that a drawdown of the W.R. Holway Reservoir will begin February 12.

An aerial view of GRDA’s W.R. Holway Reservoir, part of the Salina Pumped Storage Project, located southeast of Salina. GRDA is informing the public that it will draw down the elevation of the reservoir in mid-February to allow the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to complete a mandatory inspection.

An aerial view of GRDA’s W.R. Holway Reservoir, part of the Salina Pumped Storage Project, located southeast of Salina. GRDA is informing the public that it will draw down the elevation of the reservoir in mid-February to allow the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to complete a mandatory inspection.

According to GRDA Corporate Communications Director Justin Alberty, GRDA will lower the elevation of the reservoir to expose these areas and facilitate the inspection by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). FERC grants GRDA a license to operate the Salina Pumped Storage Project (SPSP) and this inspection is being done as part of those license requirements, said Alberty.

“This is a routine inspection which is required every five years but we are also collecting data to aid us in a repair project next year,” said Alberty. “We want the public to be aware because the level of the reservoir will be down about 42 feet below its normal operating level.”

Alberty said GRDA expects to begin refilling the reservoir by the second week of March.

Located east of Salina, Oklahoma, the Holway Reservoir is the upper reservoir attached to GRDA’s SPSP. This unique hydroelectric facility (the only one of its kind in Oklahoma), can pump water out of the Saline Creek arm of Lake Hudson and up the hillside into the upper reservoir. Then, when power generation is needed, the water is released back through the six turbine-generators in the powerhouse to create hydroelectricity. Holway Reservoir was created with the construction of the SPSP in 1968.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

Notice of Public Meeting

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) will hold a public meeting on Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. at:

Grand River Dam Authority
Board Room
226 W. Dwain Willis Ave.
Vinita, OK 74301

The purpose of this meeting is to obtain public comments regarding an application to modify docks by the Coves at Bird Island Homeowners Association in Afton, Oklahoma. The applicant proposes to replace and modify an existing dock, add another dock, and add a new pwc dock containing a swim platform. With the modifications, the facility would have a total of 18 boat slips and 8 pwc slips.
The property associated with this proposal is located in Duck Creek on Grand Lake, in Delaware County, Oklahoma.

GRDA wishes to solicit comments on this proposed project from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Assistant General Manager of Ecosystems and Lake Management, P. O. Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Floodwater release bulletin

At 10:00AM on Monday, January 4:

• Grand Lake elevation was 750.13 feet. Daily target elevation for January 4 is 742 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) main spillway gate and 1 (one) east spillway gate were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 12,689 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,909 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 26,598 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 10,844 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 630.39 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 1 (one) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 9,867 cfs of water.
• Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 33,210 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 43,077 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 28,356 cfs.

# # #

Despite some gate closures, discharge rates to remain high from Pensacola, Kerr dams

Langley – While floodwater discharges from both Pensacola Dam (Grand Lake) and Robert S. Kerr Dam (Lake Hudson) dropped slightly Wednesday morning

Floodwater from Grand Lake flows into the main spillway area on the east end of GRDA’s Pensacola Dam on Tuesday, December 29.

Floodwater from Grand Lake flows into the main spillway area on the east end of GRDA’s Pensacola Dam on Tuesday, December 29.

(December 30), the Grand River Dam Authority is reminding the public that unusually large amounts of water are still being released from both dams.

At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), floodwater discharge at both dams was decreased with the closing of some gates. However, total discharge at Pensacola Dam remained at 139,612 cubic feet per second (cfs) Wednesday afternoon, while water was being released through Kerr Dam at a rate of 192,266 cfs. Inflows into both Grand an Hudson lakes, as well as the elevation of both lakes, have also decreased slightly over the last 24 hours.

Throughout the high water conditions, GRDA personnel will continue to monitor its flood control facilities, which have operated as designed since both lakes first entered flood stage this past weekend. GRDA also remains in close contact with Mayes County Emergency Management, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the USACE to keep all parties updated on the high water conditions on its lakes.

GRDA is also reminding the public that it is illegal to enter areas of floodwater discharge. Please stay well clear of these areas and obey all barriers and signs posted to limit access.

Floodwater release bulletins will be updated as conditions warrant.

 

# # #

With more floodgate operations, discharge levels to remain high

GRDA Floodwater Release Bulletin:

Pensacola Dam Floodgates on the main spillway at GRDA’s Pensacola Dam discharging water from Grand Lake on Tuesday morning (December 29) at a rate of approximately 236,00 cubic feet per second.

Pensacola Dam
Floodgates on the main spillway at GRDA’s Pensacola Dam discharging water from Grand Lake on Tuesday morning (December 29) at a rate of approximately 236,00 cubic feet per second.

Langley – Additional floodgate operations were made at the Grand River Dam Authority’s Pensacola Dam on Tuesday (December 29) to deal with the continued heavy inflows of water into the Grand River System. At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Pensacola Dam is currently discharging 226,525 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water through its spillways and generation. Downstream at the Robert S. Kerr Dam on Lake Hudson, current discharge is 220,050 cfs. Discharges at both dams are exceptionally high and among the largest in the history of both facilities.

Based on current elevations and continued inflows into the system, it is anticipated that this level of discharge will continue at

Robert S. Kerr Dam  Floodgates at GRDA’s Robert S. Kerr Dam discharging water from Lake Hudson on Tuesday (December 29), at a rate of approximately 220,000 cubic feet per second.

Robert S. Kerr Dam
Floodgates at GRDA’s Robert S. Kerr Dam discharging water from Lake Hudson on Tuesday (December 29), at a rate of approximately 220,000 cubic feet per second.

both dams for several days.  GRDA personnel continue to monitor the situation to ensure that its flood control facilities, including Pensacola and Kerr dams, and the Salina dike, continue to operate as designed. GRDA also remains in close contact with Mayes County Emergency Management, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the USACE to keep all parties updated on the high water conditions on its lakes.

Floodwater release bulletins will be updated as conditions warrant.

 

# # #

Based on current elevations and continued inflows into the system, it is anticipated that this high level of discharge will continue at both dams for several days.

Monday evening floodgate operations increasing discharge from Pensacola Dam

Langley – Due to continued heavy inflows of water into the Grand River Watershed, the United States Army Corps of Engineers directed additional floodgate operations at the Grand River Dam Authority’s Pensacola Dam (Grand Lake) on Monday evening (December 28). With this additional gate operation, water discharges at Pensacola Dam will increase to 220,000 cubic feet per second (cfs).
 
As reported earlier in the day, GRDA’s Pensacola and Robert S. Kerr Dams, along with the Salina Dike, are operating as designed to meet flood control requirements. GRDA personnel continue to monitor the situation round the clock while also staying in close contact with Mayes County Emergency Management, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the United States Army Corps of Engineers to keep all parties updated on the high water conditions.
 
Floodwater release bulletins will be updated as conditions warrant.
 
# # #

 

Additional floodgate operations to increase discharge from Pensacola, Kerr dams…

Langley – Due to continued heavy inflows of water in the Grand River Watershed, the United States Army Corps of Engineers is directing additional floodgate operations at the Grand River Dam Authority’s Pensacola Dam (Grand Lake) and Robert S. Kerr Dam (Lake Hudson). GRDA is opening additional gates at Pensacola and this will cause the dam’s water discharge to increase to 201,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). Additional gate operations at Kerr Dam will increase discharge to 226,000 cfs.
 
Both Pensacola and Robert S. Kerr Dams, along with the Salina Dike, are operating as designed to meet flood control requirements along the Grand River System. GRDA personnel will be monitoring the flooding situation — as well as these facilities — round-the-clock to ensure the structures continue to operate as designed.
 
GRDA also continues to stay in close contact with Mayes County Emergency Management, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the United States Army Corps of Engineers to keep all parties updated on the high water conditions.
 
Floodwater release bulletins will be updated as conditions warrant.
 
# # #

 

Floodwater release bulletin 10:30am update

At 10:30AM on Monday, December 28:
  • Grand Lake elevation was 752.96 feet. Daily target elevation for December 28 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 4 (four) main spillway gates and 9 (nine) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 115,608 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,435 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 129,043 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 214,737 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 634.53 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 6 (six) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 129,618 cfs of water.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 29,970 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 159,588 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 205,722 cfs.
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Floodwater release bulletin

At 9AM on Monday, December 28:
  • Grand Lake elevation was 752.47 feet. Daily target elevation for December 28 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 4 (four) main spillway gates and 7 (seven) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 101,104 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,402 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 114,506 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 217,312 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 634.39 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 6 (six) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 107,720 cfs of water.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,320 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 139,040 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 194,106 cfs.
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Floodwater release bulletin

At 1PM on Sunday, December 27:
  • Grand Lake elevation was 747.17 feet. Daily target elevation for December 27 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, seven (7) east spillway floodgates and four (4) main gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 56,082 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,714 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 69,796 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 155,977 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 625.89 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, three (3) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 53,307 cfs of water.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,320 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 84,627 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 145,471 cfs.
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Floodwater release bulletin

At noon on Wednesday, December 23:
  • Grand Lake elevation was 744.29 feet. Daily target elevation for December 23 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) main spillway gate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 7,242 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,644 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgate and generation totaled 20,886 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 5,235 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 619.88 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • No floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 32,130 cfs of water through generation.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 21,744 cfs.
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Floodwater release bulletin

At 10:00AM on Friday, December 18:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 745.22 feet. Daily target elevation for December 15 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) main and one (1) east spillway floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 838 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing  13,642 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 14,480 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 9,870 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 621.94 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,860 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 31,680 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 16,375 cfs.

# # #

According to the United States Army Corps of Engineers, the remaining floodgates will be closed later today.

Floodwater release bulletin

At 1PM on Thursday, December 17:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 745.95 feet. Daily target elevation for December 17 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, six (6) east spillway floodgates and one (1) main gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 19,306 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,694 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 33,000 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 10,984 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 624.03 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 16,839 cfs of water.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 33,210 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 50,049 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 35,388 cfs.

 

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Floodwater release bulletin

At 2PM on Wednesday, December 16:

• Grand Lake elevation was 746.65 feet. Daily target elevation for December 16 is 742 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, seven (7) east spillway floodgates and two (2) main gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 33,748 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,778 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 47,526 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 32,519 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 624.38 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 17,024 cfs of water.
• Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 33,480 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 50,504 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 50,855 cfs.

# # #

Floodwater release bulletin

At 10AM on Tuesday, December 15:

• Grand Lake elevation was 746.36 feet. Daily target elevation for December 15 is 742 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, seven (7) east spillway floodgates and two (2) main gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 32,046 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,834 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 45,880 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 64,345 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 624.26 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) floodgate was open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 16,960 cfs of water.
• Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 34,290 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 51,250 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 52,105 cfs.

# # #

Floodwater release bulletin

At 11:00AM on Monday, December 14:

• Grand Lake elevation was 744.90 feet. Daily target elevation for December 14 is 742 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) main and seven (7) east spillway floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 17,270 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 13,674 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 30,944 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 63,163 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 622.09 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
• Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 33,750 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 33,750 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 53,592 cfs.

# # #

The United States Army Corps of Engineers has given a crest prediction for Grand Lake of 747.30 feet to occur on Thursday, December 17.

Floodwater release bulletin

At 10:00AM on Friday, December 4:

• Grand Lake elevation was 745.25 feet. Daily target elevation for December 4 is 742 feet.
• At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, one (1) east spillway floodgate was open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 100 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
• Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,201 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 11,301 cfs.
• Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 7,408 cfs.

• Lake Hudson elevation was 620.18 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
• No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
• Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 32,130 cfs of water through generation.
• Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 32,130 cfs.
• Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 12,520 cfs.

# # #

The United States Army Corps of Engineers are planning to close the remaining floodgate later today.