Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 2PM on Sunday, April 30:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 751.89 feet. Daily target elevation for April 30 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, five (5) main spillway gates and five (5) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 96,120 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,089 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 107,209 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 176,500 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 632.02 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, five (5) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 87,008 cfs.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 32,670 of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 119,678 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 140,409 cfs.
  • The Corps of Engineers does not anticipate further gate operations at either of the dams today, but will continue to monitor and make adjustments as necessary.
  • Due to these conditions, GRDA has asked local residents in the areas below the dams to please monitor local water levels and prepare to evacuate.
  • At this time, the predicted crest for Grand Lake is 755’ on Tuesday, May 2 .
  • The predicted crest for Lake Hudson is 636’ on Tuesday, May 2.

# # #

Floodwater Release Bulletin


At 7AM on Sunday, April 30:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 750.88 feet. Daily target elevation for April 30 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, four (4) main spillway gates and four (4) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 70,384 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,269 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 81,653 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 194,900 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 630.35 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 35,699 cfs.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 34,560 of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 70,259 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 116,253 cfs.
  • The Corps of Engineers is anticipating further gate operations at both dams later today.
  • Due to inflows, Pensacola Dam will be releasing 120,000 cfs later today,
  • Robert S. Kerr Dam is anticipated to be at 120,000 cfs by 2PM.
  • Due to these conditions, GRDA has asked local residents in the areas below the dams to please monitor local water levels and prepare to evacuate.
  • At this time, the predicted crest for Grand Lake is 755’ on Tuesday, May 2 .
  • The predicted crest for Lake Hudson is 636’ on Tuesday, May 2.

# # #

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 10:00AM on Saturday, April 29:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 744.90 feet. Daily target elevation for April 29 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) main spillway gates and two (2) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 18,220 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,375  cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 29,595  cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 43,200 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 621.59 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 21,997 cfs.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 30,240 of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 52,237 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 38,435 cfs.

GRDA is on standby for possible additional gate operations this afternoon, as directed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.

# # #

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At noon on Thursday, April 27:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 745.64 feet. Daily target elevation for April 27 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, four (4) main spillway gates and five (5) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 41,748  cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,482 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 53,520  cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 39,080 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 622.11 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 19,008 cfs.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,320 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 50,328 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 58,560 cfs.

As a safety precaution, GRDA will be restricting access to spillway areas below the dams. The GRDA Police Department also reminds the public that it is illegal to enter floodwater discharge.

# # # 

GRDA hosting annual Lake Launch on Friday, May 5

Langley – It’s Lake Launch time again and this year, it will be a “Grand Fiesta.”

On Friday, May 5 (Cinco de Mayo) from 6PM to 9PM, the Grand River Dam Authority will be hosting its annual lake launch event at the GRDA Ecosystems and Education Center in Langley. A free event, and open to the public, it will include food, music and displays from lake area vendors. Meanwhile, the GRDA Police Department will also have some of its equipment on display in the parking lot immediately adjacent to the dam (old lake patrol parking lot).

Each year, this event is an opportunity for the public to meet with the GRDA Police Department and Lake Operations Team and get answers to any questions you might have in regards to lake permits, rules & regulations, Pensacola Dam tours, facility use and rentals, dock billing, shoreline cleanup and GRDA’s ecosystems management efforts. It is also just a fun time to enjoy the views of Grand Lake from the Eco building while celebrating the kickoff to the lake season.

Come visit the reception and information booths, beginning at 6PM. Later in the event, GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan will also deliver the annual “state of the lake” address. Sullivan will update the public on the issues affecting Grand and Hudson lakes, including information on GRDA’s ongoing programs, goals and plans for Summer 2017.

Remember, the fun starts at 6PM. The GRDA Ecosystems and Education Center is located at 420 Hwy 28 Langley, Oklahoma, just west of Pensacola Dam.

GRDA hopes to see you there!

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 11AM on Wednesday, April 26:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 745.38 feet. Daily target elevation for April 26 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) main spillway gates and five (5) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 24,060 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,390 of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 35,450 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 36,560 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 620.77 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 31,860 cfs of water through generation.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 39,730 cfs.

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 10AM on Tuesday, April 25:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 746.11 feet. Daily target elevation for April 25 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) main spillway gates and five (5) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 26,848  cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,366 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 38,214 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 16,120 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 622.51 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, two (2) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 20,925 cfs.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 30,510  cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 51,435 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 39,655 cfs.

As a safety precaution, GRDA will be restricting access to spillway areas below the dams. The GRDA Police Department also reminds the public that it is illegal to enter floodwater discharge.

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At noon on Sunday, April 23:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 747.34 feet. Daily target elevation for April 23 is 742 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, three (3) main spillway gates and eight (8) east spillway gates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 50,080  cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,225 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 61,305  cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 62,880 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 625.66 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, three (3) floodgates were open at Robert S. Kerr Dam, discharging 40,557 cfs.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 32,130  cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 72,687 cfs.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 65,725 cfs.

As a safety precaution, GRDA will be restricting access to spillway areas below the dams. The GRDA Police Department also reminds the public that it is illegal to enter floodwater discharge.

Floodwater Release Bulletin

At 10:30 AM on Tuesday, April 18:

· Grand Lake elevation was 745.09 feet. Daily target elevation for April 18 is 742 feet.

· At the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, five (5) east floodgates were open at Pensacola Dam, discharging 7,180 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.

· Five (5) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,392 cfs of water through generation.

· Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 18,572 cfs.

· Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 16,502 cfs.

 

· Lake Hudson elevation was 619.23 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.

· No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.

· Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 27,810 cfs of water through generation.

· Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 20,253 cfs.

Scam callers using GRDA number

Langley – It has come to the attention of the Grand River Dam Authority that some “scam” callers have shown up on area phones with a number identified as belonging to the Authority, offering opportunities related to debt consolidation.

However, GRDA wants to assure the public that it does not make any such phone calls and is not affiliated with any type of robo-callers seeking your personal credit information. Please use caution when answering any such calls. They DO NOT come from GRDA. Other than for specific lake, property or permit related issues, our personnel would not contact area residents via phone.

As a good rule of thumb, do not give any credit card or bank account information over the phone unless you have initiated the phone call and you know that the company is reputable. You should not give your credit card information out when you have received the phone call from unsolicited sources.

Has your dock’s electric system been inspected?

What’s up with our dock? …. Has the electrical system been properly inspected? As the busy lake season rapidly approaches, the Grand River Dam Authority is reminding dock owners of the importance of an inspection to make sure the dock electric system is in safe working order.

What’s up with our dock? …. Has the electrical system been properly inspected? As the busy lake season rapidly approaches, the Grand River Dam Authority is reminding dock owners of the importance of an inspection to make sure the dock electric system is in safe working order.

Langley – With summer and plenty of lake visits just around the corner, the Grand River Dam Authority wants to wants to remind all dock owners of the importance of maintaining compliance with dock electrical systems. Not only can a proper inspection give you peace of mind that your electrical system is in proper working order but it could also prevent serious injury or even death.

Unfortunately, when these dock electrical systems are faulty, they can prove to be very dangerous. System defects can cause electric current to be discharged into the water or the metal components of the dock. That is why GRDA-issued dock permits require you to have your dock inspected by a licensed professional electrician. These inspections focus on several key areas including proper grounding, conduit, breakers, wiring, dock receptacles, dock metal works and electrical service boxes.

“If you plan on spending time on your dock, you need to know the electrical system has been inspected and is in proper working order,” said GRDA Vice President of Corporate Communications Justin Alberty. “Just as you inspect your boat and get it ready for the boating season, you should do the same thing with your dock.”

GRDA’s application for dock permits requires any dock wired for electricity to have a completed electrical certification form signed by an Oklahoma Licensed Electrical contractor before a final permit will be approved. Dock standards also require docks to have an electrical disconnect clearly identified and located above the high water mark. Also, any residential dock that has electrical service must adhere to the regulations set forth in the National Electric Code. Finally, any docks constructed or modified, relocated or transferred, are required to provide GRDA with a certificate signed by an Oklahoma licensed electric contractor, showing compliance with all laws, regulations and codes regarding electrical systems and wiring.

“There are standards in place for new and modified docks and transfers,” said Alberty. “However, all dock owners should have regular inspections due to the simple wear and tear and weathering that occurs over the years and perhaps over the winter months when you may not have given it as much attention.”

For more information on dock permits or other GRDA lake permitting issues, contact Janet DelliSanti in GRDA’s lake permitting offices at (918) 256 0852 or stop by the GRDA Ecosystems and Education Center in Langley.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

GRDA, USFWS share information on Northern Long-Eared Bat

Langley – A unique species of bat, the Northern long-eared bat, which makes its home around Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) lakes is listed as a threatened species (a species likely to become endangered in the future) under the Endangered Species Act. In an effort to help protect these bats and their habitat, the Grand River Dam Authority and the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) are working together to educate the public about these special lake area residents.

•Northern Long-Eared Bat Photo (Courtesy Jena Donnell, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation)

• Northern Long-Eared Bat Photo (Courtesy Jena Donnell, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation)

The northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) was added to the threatened list primarily due to a disease called white-nose syndrome (WNS), which is drastically impacting and killing hibernating bats. WNS has killed more than 6 million bats in eastern North America, and the fungus that causes the disease was recently found in caves in Northeast Oklahoma.

The northern long-eared bat is a medium-sized bat that can be distinguished by its long ears, especially when compared to most other bats found in the area. The range of this species covers 23 counties in Oklahoma, including all of Grand Lake and Lake Hudson. Northern long-eared bats are very beneficial to lake ecosystems. Each bat can consume up to 3,000 insects per night, including mosquitoes and crop pests. In fact, scientists now believe that bats, in general, save us more than $3 billion dollars per year in pest control by simply eating insects.

During the summer months, the bats roost by themselves or as part of colonies underneath the bark or in the cavities and crevices of both live and dead trees. These trees provide the bats with a thermally stable environment and protection from the weather and predators. They also rear pups or “baby bats” during this roosting time, making it crucial for these trees to be undisturbed.

To help preserve that habitat, GRDA and the USFWS offer the following tips:

• Don’t cut trees greater than 3 inches in diameter at breast height (dbh) between April 1 and July 31, unless the tree poses a hazard to property.
• For hazardous trees, closely inspect the tree for roosting bats prior to removal.
• When safety is not a concern, leave dead or dying trees on your property.
• As always, GRDA recommends that you DON’T CUT, DON’T DIG, and DON’T BUILD below the GRDA taking line, or within the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) flowage easement until you have contacted the GRDA Ecosystems and Education Center at (918) 782-4726 or lakepermits@grda.com, and USACE at (918) 669-7253.

If you are interested in learning more about the northern long-eared bat visit: https://www.fws.gov/Midwest/endangered/mammals/nleb/nlebFactSheet.html

If you are interested in learning more about white-nose syndrome visit:
https: www.whitenosesyndrome.org

For more information, you can also contact the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department at (918) 256-0723.

•White-nose syndrome occurrence map (provided by United States Geological Survey)

• White-nose syndrome occurrence map (provided by United States Geological Survey)

 •Northern Long-Eared Bat Range Map (provided by United States Fish & Wildlife Service)

• Northern Long-Eared Bat Range Map (provided by United States Fish & Wildlife Service)

GRDA completes successful “first fire” of Unit 3 turbine

Chouteau – A major milestone along the Grand River Dam Authority’s path to construct a highly-efficient combined cycle gas generation plant was achieved on Tuesday (March 14) at the Grand River Energy Center (GREC), east of Chouteau.

A shot of GRDA’s new 495 megawatt (MW) Unit 3 combined cycle gas generation plant. The successful “first fire” of the unit’s combustion turbine was completed on Tuesday, March 14. This was one important step along the path to commissioning the new generator, which is expected to be fully operational later by summer.

A shot of GRDA’s new 495 megawatt (MW) Unit 3 combined cycle gas generation plant. The successful “first fire” of the unit’s combustion turbine was completed on Tuesday, March 14. This was one important step along the path to commissioning the new generator, which is expected to be fully operational later by summer.

GRDA successfully completed the “first fire” of the natural gas combustion turbine which spins at the heart of the Unit 3, 495 megawatt facility. That first fire is one of the important steps in the commissioning process for the new unit, which is expected to begin operations in early summer.

“I am pleased to announce that the ‘first fire’ of the combustion turbine was a success this morning,” stated GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan in a memo to the GRDA Board and employees. “This is an exciting day for GRDA and its customers.”

That turbine, an MHPSA M501J model, was constructed in Savannah, Georgia, and is the first of its kind to be deployed in the Western Hemisphere. It will be fueled by Oklahoma natural gas has the potential to make Unit 3 the most efficient combined-cycle generator in the entire United States when fully operational. A combined-cycle generator produces electricity in two ways: first, natural gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine-generator and then, heat from that process is recaptured and used to produce steam to turn another steam turbine-generator. 

GRDA broke ground on the Unit 3 project in January 2015. Since that time, hundreds of contractors have been on-site to help GRDA construct its first new generation plant since the coal fired units (also located GREC) were completed in the early 1980s. 

According to a 2015 study by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, GRDA’s construction of Unit 3 has helped the Authority pump approximately $1 billion into Oklahoma’s economy during the first two years of construction. Long term, the efficient, abundant and reliable power produced by Unit 3 will continue to support the Oklahoma economy, and provide electricity to GRDA ratepayers, for decades to come.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

Notice of Public Meeting

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) will hold a public meeting on Friday, March 31, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. at:

Grand River Dam Authority
Ecosystems & Education Center
Grand Hall
420 E. Hwy 28
Langley, OK 74350

The purpose of this meeting is to obtain public comments regarding proposed changes to Grand River Dam Authority Dock Applications. These proposed changes are on the GRDA website at www.grda.com.

GRDA wishes to solicit comments on these changes from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Assistant General Manager of Ecosystems and Lake Management, P. O. Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Application for Waiver
Application for Permit Commerical HOA Project
Application for Permit Private Dock Requiring Directional Bearing
Application for Private Dock

GRDA, GLSPS partnering to promote life jacket use

Grand Lake Sail & Power Squadron Commander Bruce Watson (far right) and GLSPS Executive Officer Ken Moore (left) accept a check from GRDA Chief of Law Enforcement/Lake Operations Brian Edwards and GRDA Community Relations Officer Ed Ferguson during the Tulsa Boat, Sport & Travel Show on Thursday, February 2. The organizations are joining efforts to promote life jacket usage around the GRDA lakes area.

Grand Lake Sail & Power Squadron Commander Bruce Watson (far right) and GLSPS Executive Officer Ken Moore (left) accept a check from GRDA Chief of Law Enforcement/Lake Operations Brian Edwards and GRDA Community Relations Officer Ed Ferguson during the Tulsa Boat, Sport & Travel Show on Thursday, February 2. The organizations are joining efforts to promote life jacket usage around the GRDA lakes area.

Tulsa – Ahead of the busy 2017 boating season, the Grand River Dam Authority and Grand Lake Sail & Power Squadron (GLSPS) are reminding the public of the importance of proper life jacket usage. At a special press conference, held at the Tulsa Boat, Sport & Travel Show on February 2, the organizations shared information on life jacket sizes, statistics and simply stressed one important fact: “Life jackets won’t work if you don’t wear them.”

Also at that event, GRDA presented GLSPS with a check for $5,200, to help the organization in its efforts to promote life jacket safety around the GRDA lakes area. The GLSPS is actively involved in community service and boater education programs in the lake area.

According to statistics from the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, 76 percent of all boating fatality victims drown. And of those victims, a staggering 85 percent are not wearing life jackets.

“In a boating accident, you can be thrown into the water unexpectedly,” said GRDA Chief of Law Enforcement/Lake Operations Brian Edwards, “and in those instances, there is no time to grab a life jacket. That’s why it is extremely important to already have it on.”

Not only does wearing a life jacket dramatically increase survival chances in the water, but it also buys its wearer time. If you go into the water without a jacket, you will exert a lot of energy trying to stay afloat. By wearing a life jacket, you expend dramatically less energy as you wait for assistance.

As part of the efforts to encourage life jacket usage, GRDA and the GLSPS are also educating the public on the different types of jackets available. Once upon a time, many people complained that life jackets were bulky, hot and restricted movement, all of which made them uncomfortable to wear. However, today, that is no longer an excuse.

“These days, you can find a life jacket to fit just about any activity you have planned,” said Edwards. “They come in many styles, colors and are made of materials that make them much more comfortable to wear.”

To ensure that you have the right life jacket, GRDA offers the following tips:

• To help determine the right jacket for you, first check the label for rating type, intended use, size & weight and strength test. Also, the label should indicate if the jacket is approved by the United States Coast Guard.

• Buy your own jacket. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL.

• If you are boating with children, make sure they are wearing properly fitted, child-sized life jackets based on their weight. Do not buy a life jacket for your child to “grow into.”

• Try it on to check the fit. Once the straps and buckles are secured, it should not slip over your head or come down above your ears.

• Never use water toys in place of an approved life jacket.

• Wear your life jacket to increase your chance of survival in an accident and to set a good example for others.

• Check your life jacket yearly for flotation and fit. Makes sure it is still in good condition, with no rips or tears.

For more information on life jackets and their proper usage, visit the “GRDA Police” tab on www.grda.com. You can also contact the GRDA Police Department at (918) 256-0911.

Notice to the Public

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

Please be advised Grand River Dam Authority is proposing changes to its Lake Rules and Purchasing Policy. In addition, new rules are proposed for Repairs and Improvements to Grand River Dam Authority Facilities. Written and oral comments will be accepted January 18, 2017 through February 17, 2017.

For more information and the proposed rules
Chapter 35 Notice of Rulemaking Intent
Chapter 35 Lake Rules
Chapter 35 Rule Impact Statement

NOTICE OF WAIVER REQUEST AND PUBLIC HEARING

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is in receipt of an application to add 18 slips at Southwinds Marina located on Grand Lake, in Delaware County. The applicant requests a waiver of the 1/3 of the cove rule for one dock located at the project. A public hearing is scheduled for Thursday, January 19, at 10:00 AM at GRDA’s Administrative Headquarters located in Vinita, Oklahoma. GRDA wishes to solicit comments on this proposed project from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Director of Ecosystems Management, PO Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Notice Of Waiver Request

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is in receipt of an application to transfer ownership for Indian Hills Marina on Grand Lake, in Delaware County. Indian Hills Marina has applied to make modifications to the overall configuration of the marina. The applicant requests a waiver of the 125’, parallel slip, and 1/3 of the cove rule for four docks located at the project. A public hearing is scheduled for Thursday, January 19, at 9:00 AM at GRDA’s Administrative Headquarters located in Vinita, Oklahoma. GRDA wishes to solicit comments on this proposed project from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Director of Ecosystems Management, PO Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Notice Of Waiver Request

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is in receipt of an application for Red 11 Resort Marina on Grand Lake, in Delaware County. The applicant requests waivers of the 125’ and parallel slip rule to permit existing docks that include a 24’ X 150’ dock with 10 covered slips, a 38’ X 137’ dock with 6 covered slips and an 8’ X 32’ uncovered courtesy dock. No additions are proposed at this time. GRDA wishes to solicit comments on this proposed project from all interested individuals and businesses. If you would like to submit written comments or have any questions, please contact Darrell E. Townsend II, Ph.D., Director of Ecosystems Management, PO Box 70, Langley, OK 74350, (918) 256-0616.

Rothermel to serve as next GRDA CFO

GRDA’s Eddie Rothermel has been selected as the organization’s next Chief Financial Officer. He is an 11-year GRDA veteran.

GRDA’s Eddie Rothermel has been selected as the organization’s next Chief Financial Officer. He is an 11-year GRDA veteran.

Vinita – Eddie Rothermel, an 11-year veteran of the Grand River Dam Authority, has been selected as the organization’s next Chief Financial Officer.  He will succeed current CFO Carolyn Dougherty who will officially retire February 1, 2017.

For over three decades, Rothermel has served in various accounting, auditing and financial management positions with Oklahoma state agencies. Prior to joining GRDA as Deputy CFO in 2005, he spent 15 years with the Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector, where he served as audit manager.  He earned his B.S. in Accounting from the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO, Edmond) and is a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), as well as a Certified Fraud Examiner, Chartered Global Management Accountant and Certified Procurement Officer with the State of Oklahoma.

“Eddie Rothermel brings a wealth of state agency experience and knowledge to the position of CFO,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “He has provided solid leadership in his current role as Deputy CFO and I look forward to working with him in his new role to continue our upward trajectory.  We are grateful for the contributions he has already made to GRDA and are anticipating many more in the future.”

Dougherty, a 30-year GRDA veteran, echoed Sullivan’s comments, adding that she can retire comfortably, knowing that both GRDA’s customers and the agency’s financial department are in Rothermel’s very capable hands.

“I’m thrilled with this decision by the GRDA board and management,” said Dougherty. “I would not have made it the past several years without Eddie. He is the kind of day-to-day leader that will continue to accomplish GRDA’s financial goals. I can’t wait to see what the finance department does over the next few years under his leadership.”

Rothermel will lead a GRDA financial operation that oversees $330 million in annual operating expenses and an annual payroll of approximately $38 million. According to the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, this year GRDA’s operations will generate $541 million in economic activity with a more than $1 billion total impact on the Oklahoma economy.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

GRDA to make more land available for PVA hunts along Neosho River

An aerial view of some of the property along the Neosho River, where the annual “Great American Deer Hunt” will take place later this month. Earlier this year, the Grand River Dam Authority and the Mid-America Chapter of Paralyzed Veterans of America expanded on an existing partnership to make even more GRDA property available to PVA hunters in 2016.

An aerial view of some of the property along the Neosho River, where the annual “Great American Deer Hunt” will take place later this month. Earlier this year, the Grand River Dam Authority and the Mid-America Chapter of Paralyzed Veterans of America expanded on an existing partnership to make even more GRDA property available to PVA hunters in 2016.

Miami – Two years ago, a partnership between the Grand River Dam Authority and the Mid-America Chapter of the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) resulted in increased hunting opportunities for PVA members. Today, a new agreement will result in even more opportunities.

In 2014, GRDA first made some of its Ottawa County property (along the Neosho River) available to the PVA for the group’s annual “Great American Deer Hunt” for disabled veterans, which was hosted in cooperation with the River Bottom Sportsmen Club, the City of Miami, and Northeastern Oklahoma A&M. That event had taken place on adjacent property since 2008 but the addition of GRDA lands allowed the PVA the room to accommodate more hunters. Last month, the GRDA Board of Directors gave its approval to a new lease between the organizations that will open up even more property and extend those opportunities throughout the hunting season. Outside the “Great American Deer Hunt” (which takes place October 28 -30) GRDA will also devote 625 acres for PVA to use during deer, waterfowl, and turkey season.

The United States flag is displayed in downtown Miami, Oklahoma, prior to the 2014 “Great American Deer Hunt” for disabled veterans. That year, the Grand River Dam Authority first partnered with the Mid-American Chapter of Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) and made some of its Neosho River bottoms property available to hunters. Prior to the upcoming 2016 hunt, GRDA is making even more property available.

The United States flag is displayed in downtown Miami, Oklahoma, prior to the 2014 “Great American Deer Hunt” for disabled veterans. That year, the Grand River Dam Authority first partnered with the Mid-American Chapter of Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) and made some of its Neosho River bottoms property available to hunters. Prior to the upcoming 2016 hunt, GRDA is making even more property available.

“These annual hunts have been very successful,” said GRDA Neosho River Bottoms Director Aaron Roper. “We’re happy to be a part of providing a wider range of outdoor opportunities to PVA members.”

Over 40 veterans with spinal cord injuries have had the opportunity to participate in the hunt since it first started in 2008. And, with the help of its major partners and many other private contributors, MAPVA is able to provide the visiting hunters not only with the opportunity but also the gear, lodging and meals needed as they make the trip as PVA’s guests.

“Hunting opportunities for people with mobility impairments are very limited and public lands offer limited access for the disabled, said Mid-America PVA Chapter President Bill Kokendoffer. “When GRDA and MAPVA came to this agreement it opened new doors for our outdoor enthusiast. It offers a place where these disabled hunters can go and not be hindered by other hunters taking the prime spots.”

Kokendoffer added that limiting the access to no more than four hunters per hunt also gives the participants a better chance of success. “We’re looking forward to many years of successful hunts on this property,” he said.

The opportunity to contribute to the future successes of the annual “Great Deer Hunt” is another way for GRDA to meet its multi-faceted mission in Oklahoma. Earlier this summer, the Authority also announced a lease agreement with Miami’s Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College which will help expand agricultural education opportunities. The $1/year agreement allows the college to lease approximately 1,600 acres of GRDA lands, also along the Neosho River. Some of that property will be subleased by NEO to area pecan producers and ranchers. Other property will be used for an outdoor, hands-on agricultural classroom.

“We’re looking forward to continuing our work with PVA and other partners in the Neosho Bottoms,” added Roper.

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

Area business, organizations joining forces on lake area cleanup efforts

In an ongoing effort to help keep Grand Lake’s scenery as “grand” as possible, the Grand River Dam Authority is working with the new Grove Community Living and Learning Committee (GCLLC) on a beautification initiative.

While the committee is planning new community clean-up programs for the Grove area, GRDA will be working to coordinate quarterly cleanups in several key areas of the lake, beginning near Grove.

Each month GRDA Superintendent of Shoreline Enforcement Scott Horton flies the shoreline of Grand Lake to identify compliance issues. As a result of those flights, he has identified areas which have a high concentration of trash and old dock foam. Those flights led to the establishment of the quarterly cleanup schedule, which began in Duck Creek last July. Because of the work done at that time, over six tons of dock foam and trash were removed from the area.

The next cleanup is scheduled for the Sailboat Bridge area of Grand Lake on THURSDAY, October 27 (this date was changed from Wednesday, October 19 due to severe weather in the forecast). Several lake area dock construction companies including Goldner Company, Shepherd’s Dock Construction, DD Welding and Fabrication, Premier Dock Construction LLC and the Dock Guys will be participating. Also, inmate work crews from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections providing additional labor. Horton said a similar cleanup –again in Duck Creek – will also take place in November.

Grove’s Pete Churchwell, who serves both as chairman of the GRDA Board and chairman of the GCLLC, said this type of cleanup effort goes hand-in-hand with the initiatives of the GCLCC. While GRDA’s efforts will focus on the water, GCLCC will focus on the land around the shoreline. Going forward, education, community health and lake access area for non-boaters will also be GCLCC priorities. However, it all must start with clean up and, working together, these organizations are doing just that.

 

Ahead of late October bond issue… GRDA receives credit rating upgrades

Vinita – As the Grand River Dam Authority continues preparing for a large bond issue later this month, it is getting a boost and some positive reinforcement, from the nation’s credit rating agencies.

A graph showing the Grand River Dam Authority’s trend of improving credit ratings (2005-2016).

A graph showing the Grand River Dam Authority’s trend of improving credit ratings (2005-2016).

Perhaps the biggest news came last. On Friday, October 7, Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings announced that it would raise its long-term rating and underlying rating (SPUR) to ‘AA-‘ from ‘A+’ on GRDA’s earlier bonds. Further, S&P announced it was assigning an “AA-“ rating to the upcoming bond issue, with a stable outlook.

That news came on the heels of a Thursday (October 6) announcement by Fitch that it was assigning an “A+” rating to the Authority’s latest bond issue. Fitch also upgraded GRDA’s 2008 and 2010 series bonds to “A+” from “A.” Earlier in the week, Moody’s also assigned an A1 rating to the upcoming bond issue and reaffirmed its “A1” rating of existing GRDA bonds.

“This is tremendous news from all agencies,” said GRDA Chief Financial Officer Carolyn Dougherty. “This is the kind of affirmation from the credit rating industry that our team has worked so hard to receive. The efforts of our board, management team and workforce are reflected here.”

Dougherty added that strong customer relationships also contribute greatly to this kind of credit rating improvements. “This is what can happen when we are able to work so closely with our customers on long-term planning,” she said. “Our contracts reflect the long-term intent of these relationships and enable us to utilize electric generation resources that are appropriately-sized to meet customer needs.”

The debt profile needed to acquire and operate those resources is also shaped to meet the diversity of the GRDA customer mix, which allows for maximum use of tax-exempt bonds, she added. In the end, the result is a long-term and affordable source of electricity for the customer and an improved financial foundation for GRDA, as recognized by the rating agencies.
In its statement regarding its upgrade, S&P noted several key factors in the Authority’s favor. A diverse power supply, improved cash flow, significantly reduced debt service requirements, prudent risk management policies, good operating performance and ample system capacity to meet the energy demands of its customers through 2031 were just some of the reasons S&P cited for the upgrade.

The agency also noted that “in our view, [GRDA’s] financial profile has strengthened in recent years, and actual results have generally met or exceeded forecasts.”

In a similar statement, Fitch noted that its ratings of GRDA reflected “the recent improvement in GRDA’s financial profile, as well as Fitch’s expectation that the Authority will sustain financial metrics supportive of the ‘A+’ rating category.”

Finally, Moody’s stated that “GRDA’s competitive advantage remains its low generating costs, which allows it to charge an electric rate that consistently ranks among the lowest in Oklahoma.”

GRDA will use the funds from the October 25 bond issue to refinance other outstanding bonds, similar to how a homeowner may refinance a mortgage. That effort, coupled with this recent news from the rating agencies, will result in substantial savings for the Authority’s ratepayers.

“The decision to pursue this bond refinancing was driven by our goal to save our ratepayers money,” said GRDA Chief Executive Officer Dan Sullivan. “We are committed to efficient, reliable and competitive operations and these improved credit ratings illustrate how that commitment also leads to improved financial stability.”

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

GRDA Crews headed to Florida to assist with electricity restoration efforts

A total of 12 Grand River Dam Authority employees and 11 vehicles rolled out of the Authority’s Transmission Maintenance Headquarters before dawn on Friday, October 7. They were headed to Jacksonville Beach, Florida, to assist with power restoration in the wake of Hurricane Matthew.

A total of 12 Grand River Dam Authority employees and 11 vehicles rolled out of the Authority’s Transmission Maintenance Headquarters before dawn on Friday, October 7. They were headed to Jacksonville Beach, Florida, to assist with power restoration in the wake of Hurricane Matthew.

Pryor – In the early morning hours of Friday (October 7), just before dawn, 12 employees of the Grand River Dam Authority’s power line maintenance and fleet management departments climbed into their bucket trucks, line crew trucks and other department vehicles and headed to the East Coast. Waiting for them there? The destruction left behind by Hurricane Matthew.

It was less than 24 hours before the early morning departure that GRDA first learned of the need for its assistance in Florida. As part of a nationwide mutual aid agreement among electric utilities within the American Public Power Association (APPA), crews from all around the country are able to lend a hand to other storm-affected utilities at times like these. That network of utilities and planning efforts means the mobilization of resources can happen quickly.

GRDA’s mutual aid crew, including Doug Feeling, Jesse Payton, Josh Brazil, Jeff Ryan, Cody Ritter, David Hefner, Trent Fittje, Tommy Hill, Jerry Doak, Lindy Huxtable, Larry Hale and (not pictured) Chester Rothhammer. This crew left early Friday morning (October 7) for Jacksonville Beach, Florida, to assist in restoring the damage caused by Hurricane Matthew.

GRDA’s mutual aid crew, including Doug Feeling, Jesse Payton, Josh Brazil, Jeff Ryan, Cody Ritter, David Hefner, Trent Fittje, Tommy Hill, Jerry Doak, Lindy Huxtable, Larry Hale and (not pictured) Chester Rothhammer. This crew left early Friday morning (October 7) for Jacksonville Beach, Florida, to assist in restoring the damage caused by Hurricane Matthew.

The GRDA Team was headed for Jacksonville Beach, where it will assist Beaches Energy in restoration efforts. They expected to begin on Sunday (October 9), after a full assessment of the damage was completed.

“Even though they’re going all the way to Florida to assist, it’s nothing that our guys are not prepared for,” said GRDA Corporate Communications Director Justin Alberty. “Of course, having dealt with Oklahoma weather, they have plenty of experience in system repair and restoration following storms. Priority number one will be to work safely and after that, the goal is to assist the local utility in getting power restored as soon as possible.”

Alberty added that GRDA crews have provided this type of assistance before. Back in 2005, several employees went to Louisiana to help restore power in the aftermath of Hurricane Rita.

“For a few of these guys, this is the second deployment to a hurricane site,” he added.

With a convoy of 11 large utility vehicles, the 1,180-mile trip to the work area will be a slow one. However, once the work begins, there will be long days and plenty to do.

“We’re proud of these guys and proud that GRDA can help another electricity provider,” said Alberty. “It may be all the way over on the East Coast, but I think our team still sees it as an opportunity to lend an hand to a neighbor at a critical time.”

Headquartered in Vinita, GRDA is Oklahoma’s state-owned electric utility; fully funded by revenues from electric and water sales instead of taxes. Each day, GRDA strives to be an “Oklahoma agency of excellence” by focusing on the 5 E’s: electricity, economic development, environmental stewardship, employees and efficiency.

Floodwater release bulletin

At 7:00 PM on Thursday, October 6:

  • Grand Lake elevation was 741.99 feet.
  • The Grand River Dam Authority has opened one (1) main floodgate at Pensacola Dam, discharging 5,496 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water.
  • Six (6) units were online at the Pensacola Dam powerhouse, releasing 11,949 cfs of water through generation.
  • Releases through floodgates and generation totaled 17,455 cfs.
  • Inflows into Grand Lake totaled 16,890 cfs.
  • Lake Hudson elevation was 620.97 feet. Normal elevation is 619 feet.
  • No floodgates were open at the Robert S. Kerr Dam.
  • Four units were online at the Robert S. Kerr Dam powerhouse, releasing 27,000 cfs of water through generation.
  • Inflows into Lake Hudson totaled 17,452 cfs.