Water Quality Map

GRDA Water Quality Sampling Sites:

Point and click map icons to access most recent sampling data.

Dock 101

Permit Numbers

Upon issuance of said permit, a number will be assigned to each residential Dock. These numbers shall be no smaller than three (3) inches high and shall be affixed to the residential Dock as to be easily visible from the water.

Transfer of Ownership

If ownership of a residential Dock is sold or transferred, the new owner must apply for a new permit and notify the Office of Ecosystems Management within fourteen (14) days after property transfer is complete or remove the facility and restore the use area within thirty days (30) after ownership transfer. The application process to transfer an existing residential Dock shall be the same for requesting a permit for a new Dock; however, the applicant need not have a new survey completed if (i) an old survey clearly indicates the GRDA taking line or (ii) the legal description of a previous owner’s deed of conveyance uses the GRDA taking line as a point of reference. GRDA reserves the right to require a new survey, if justified by the circumstances.

Waiver

The Board, upon written application and after hearing subject to the procedural and substantive standards hereinafter set forth, may grant waivers to the application of these rules and regulations:

  • Waivers of these rules and regulations may be granted by the Board of Directors of GRDA upon application. In approving waivers of these rules and regulations, the Board of Directors shall consider positive and negative impacts to the following:
  • Characteristics, zoning and prevailing permitted uses within a half-mile radius of the proposed activity.
  • Shoreline topography and geometry.
  • Safety, navigation and flood control requirements.
  • Environmental impacts. Potential economic development and tourism benefits.
  • Recreational use impacts.
  • Statutory mandates (82 O.S. 861 et seq.).

Compliance
If the permit holder fails to comply with applicable laws, rules or regulations or ceases to use, operate or maintain a permitted facility, the Office of Ecosystems Management may revoke the permit and cause the facility to be removed by contract or otherwise, and the permit holder agrees to pay all costs incurred thereof.

Dock Damage
If a Dock is damaged by weather (i.e. high winds, tornado), the permit holder has ninety (90) days to repair.   Rules as of May 2007

For all dock-related information, contact:
Janet DelliSanti
918 256 0852

Safety First Around Our Dams

Safety around its hydroelectric facilities is a top priority for the Grand River Dam Authority.  Signs, buoys, sirens, fencing and flashing lights are all intended to notify those in the area when floodgates are open, generators are operating or water is rising swiftly.

Signs :

Posted at GRDA hydroelectric facility (Pensacola Dam, Robert S. Kerr Dam, and the Salina Pumped Storage Project) to warn of extreme danger in floodgate areas. Please be aware of other signs near GRDA facilities that notify you of no trespassing areas, no diving areas, or unstable footing.

Buoys :

Red buoys and cabling above and below spillway gates and hydroelectric powerhouse restrict access to dangerous areas associated with power generation or floodgate releases.

Flashing Lights :

At hydroelectric facilities, the flashing lights are initiated when floodgates are opened or generation is initiated.

Fencing:

In place to identify borders and to restrict access to certain areas near the hydroelectric facilities.

Sirens :

These are located at various locations on the hydroelectric facilities and are utilized prior to the operation of hydroelectric generators and/or floodgates.

Grand Lake Lighthouses :

As navigational aids, several lighthouses are located on Grand Lake, around the shoreline and in areas of shallow water.  The Grand River Dam Authority has an ongoing maintenance program in place to ensure the lighthouses are functioning properly.

If you have concerns regarding the lighthouses on Grand Lake, please contact GRDA at 918-256-0644

Duck Creek Rules

Annual Lake Lowering

Grand Lake Rule Curve Chart

In 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued the Grand River Dam Authority a new license to operate the Pensacola Dam and Grand Lake. In 1996, an amendment to that license required GRDA to begin holding Grand Lake at different elevations throughout the year.

In early August, this license requires GRDA to begin lowering the elevation of Grand Lake to meet a 741’ mark by September 1. The lake is then held at this elevation until mid-October, when GRDA is required to begin raising the elevation to 742’ by month’s end. The license then calls for the lake to be held at 742’ through the winter and spring months, before GRDA begins raising it to meet a 744’ mark on June 1. It is then held at this elevation again, until August 1.

The accompanying graphics illustrate the elevation requirements and schedule mandated by GRDA’s operating license for Pensacola Dam/Grand Lake, as issued by FERC.

GRDA’s testing shows…Grand Lake conditions continue improvement

Langley – In the two weeks since the Grand River Dam Authority removed its “no bodily contact” warning for Grand Lake waters (originally issued because of Blue Green Algae) water conditions have continued to improve greatly.

That is the word from the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department. The department has continued monitoring and testing efforts since the Blue Green Algae (BGA) outbreak was confirmed in late June.

“Our most recent tests have been negative for toxins,” said GRDA Ecosystems Management Director Dr. Darrell Townsend. “We have seen steady improvement in the conditions since early July.”

On July 13, after testing showed a significant decrease in BGA toxin levels, GRDA removed all its warnings against bodily contact with lake waters.

“At this point, we are simply asking the public to remain vigilant and avoid areas of the water where BGA scums appear to be present,” said Townsend.

For more information on BGA, and other lake safety information, visit grda.com.

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Blue Green Algae – Video Update

GRDA is making available the video update that was presented to the board members during the board meeting July 13th, 2011

BGA July Update
Runtime
4:18
View count
262

 

GRDA removes warning for Grand Lake

Chandler – The latest Grand Lake water samples — showing a significant decrease in blue green algae (BGA) toxicity — have prompted the Grand River Dam Authority to remove its “no bodily contact” warning for Grand Lake waters. Rather, the public is now simply encouraged to use caution in the water and avoid body contact with areas of visible BGA accumulations and “scum.” Meanwhile, GRDA continues to encourage the public to enjoy all activities in the Grand Lake area.

“Conditions have improved significantly and at this point, we are no longer discouraging body contact with the waters,”
Dr. Darrell Townsend
GRDA Ecosystems Management Director

GRDA made the decision to remove the warning following an update from GRDA staff at the July 13 board meeting in Chandler.

 “Conditions have improved significantly and at this point, we are no longer discouraging body contact with the waters,” said GRDA Ecosystems Management Director Dr. Darrell Townsend. “Rather, we are simply urging the public to use common sense, remain vigilant and avoid those areas where BGA scums appear to be present.”

The following swimming precautions are also recommended by the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ):

  • Hold nose or wear nose plugs when jumping into the water
  • Wash open skin cuts and scrapes with clean soap and water immediately after swimming
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming
  • Wear ear plugs to prevent ear infections
  • Wear swim goggles or masks to prevent eye infections
  • Avoid swimming near storm drains (pipes that drain polluted water from streets)
  • Take children to the restroom frequently/Use swim diapers on infants
  • Stay away from any area that that has floating debris, stagnant water, oil sheens or dead fish

In his report to the board on July 13, Townsend said samples taken earlier this week showed the decrease, which may indicate the algae is dying off. However, he said, GRDA will continue its daily monitoring and sampling efforts, as long as conditions warrant. If conditions do change, GRDA will notify the public.

For more information on BGA, visit grda.com or Department of Environmental Quality.

GRDA to continue daily water monitoring, sampling…

While the most recent results from water sample testing in Grand Lake has shown a significant decrease in levels of blue green algae (BGA) toxins, the Grand River Dam Authority continues to warn against recreational activities that involve bodily contact with Grand Lake waters.

Those results are from water samples gathered in both the Duck Creek and Horse Creek areas of Grand Lake. According to the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department, that demonstrates a real improvement in the BGA outbreak, however the BGA scums (visible accumulations) found throughout areas around the lake continue to be prevalent and toxic, and need to be avoided.

Though the public is still very much encouraged to enjoy activities in the Grand Lake area, avoidance of bodily contact with Grand Lake waters is still in the public’s best interest. GRDA will continue its daily monitoring and sampling efforts indefinitely, as long as conditions warrant.

Additional information on BGA can be found by following the links on this website, or by visiting the BGA link to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

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GRDA receives new results Thursday afternoon … Tests Results Show Significant Decrease in Blue Green Algae Toxins

Langley — The Grand River Dam Authority is reporting that the most recent results from water sample testing in Grand Lake has shown a significant decrease in levels of blue green algae (BGA) toxins.

Those results are from water samples gathered in both the Duck Creek and Horse Creek areas of Grand Lake. According to the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department, that demonstrates a real improvement in the BGA outbreak, however the BGA scums (visible accumulations) found throughout areas around the lake continue to be prevalent and toxic, and need to be avoided.

While the public is still very much encouraged to enjoy activities in the Grand Lake area, GRDA continues to warn against recreational activities that involve bodily contact with Grand Lake waters. Also, be very cautious when using fish cleaning stations and watering lawns with lake water.

Test results can differ from day to day, and avoidance of bodily contact with Grand Lake waters is still in the public’s best interest.

GRDA will continue with its daily monitoring and sampling efforts indefinitely, as long as conditions warrant.

More information on BGA is available by following the links on grda.com, Facebook and Twitter. GRDA will also update these sites with the latest information when available.

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BGA Physicians Reference

Blue Green Algae Fact Sheets

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) remind lake visitors of the possibility of Blue Green Algae (BGA) in Grand Lake.

If you have suspicions of other possible outbreaks on Grand Lake, the public can contact the GRDA Ecosystems Department at (918) 256 0723 or jjaggars@grda.com.  Residents can also contact the Department of Environmental Quality at 1-800-522-0206.

BGA July Update
Runtime
4:18
View count
262

Fact sheet

Physicians Reference

Vet Reference

 

 

BGA Veterinarians Reference

DEQ and GRDA Encourage Lake Visitors to be Cautious

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) remind lake visitors of the possibility of Blue Green Algae (BGA) in Grand Lake. The two agencies continue to test and monitor lake waters.  BGA are microscopic organisms that are naturally present in lakes and streams, usually in low numbers. However, the algae can become abundant in shallow, warm water that receives heavy sunlight. While most BGA are not toxic, toxins can be produced in some algae blooms.

On Friday, June 24, the agencies confirmed the presence of BGA near Bernice State Park, in portions of Horse Creek and Duck Creek. On Wednesday, June 29, a BGA presence was also confirmed in Grand Lake’s Ketchum Cove and Party Cove. The GRDA Ecosystems Management Department also collected water samples from Woodard Hollow and Honey Creek on Wednesday. There is a potential for BGA in these areas of the lake and the public is encouraged to use common sense, and follow the DEQ advisories.

Additionally, people should be cautious when using fish cleaning stations and if watering lawns with lake water. Also, pets and livestock should not drink the water or swim in the affected areas. Finally, avoid areas of visible algae accumulation when boating.  “GRDA and ODEQ just want the public to remain careful and vigilant,” said GRDA Corporate Communications Director Justin Alberty. “There are areas of the lake where BGA has been confirmed, and there are other areas being tested. We just want lake users to be aware.”

According to information from a DEQ fact sheet, BGA may look like thick pea soup, green, bluish, brownish, or reddish-green paint.  When it washes up on shore, it may look like a thick green mat. A link to that DEQ fact sheet is available on grda.com.   Alberty said GRDA has received several calls in recent days from lake area residents reporting possible areas of BGA. “We appreciate that input,” he said. “As we continue to test and monitor, we also want the public to notify us if they see areas where they suspect BGA to be present.”

If you have suspicions of other possible outbreaks on Grand Lake, the public can contact the GRDA Ecosystems Department at (918) 256 0723 or jjaggars@grda.com.  Residents can also contact the Department of Environmental Quality at 1-800-522-0206.

Avoid body contact with water at Bernice State Park

An Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) recommendation to temporarily avoid body contact with water at Bernice State Park is prompting the Grand River Dam Authority to remind lake enthusiasts to take extra precaution on Grand Lake this summer. The state park is putting up signage to notify the public.

DEQ made the recommendation after the GRDA Ecosystems Management’s water lab confirmed blue green algae (BGA) was in the waters near the park, and in portions of Horse Creek and the back of Duck Creek.

BGA are microscopic organisms that are naturally present in lakes and streams, usually in low numbers. However, the algae can become abundant in shallow, warm water that receives heavy sunlight. While most BGA are not toxic, toxins can be produced in some algae blooms. Results of the tests of BGA water samples taken by the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department will not be available until early next week.

However, as a precaution DEQ made its recommendation to avoid body contact.

GRDA joins with the DEQ in urging lake users to practice caution and use common sense when visiting the areas of the lake where BGA may be present.  “In the interest of public safety, we are just asking lake users to be careful and vigilant,” said GRDA Corporate Communications Director Justin Alberty. “Our ecosystems department’s monitoring efforts are ongoing, but we ask for the public’s help in that regard If you see areas of the lake where you believe BGA is present, please contact GRDA.”

According to information from a DEQ fact sheet, BGA may look like thick pea soup, green paint, or bluish, brownish, or reddish-green paint. When it washes up on shore, it may appear to look like a thick green mat. BGA are made up of extremely small organisms that are difficult to pick up and hold. Consumption or inhalation of BGA can be unsafe. Green algae are stringy and made up of grass-green strands. These green algae are harmless.

If you have suspicions of other possible outbreaks on Grand Lake, the public can contact the GRDA Ecosystems Department at (918) 256 0723 or jjaggars@grda.com.
Residents can also contact the Department of Environmental Quality at 1-800-522-0206.

GRDA Offers Safe Boating Tips

Grand Lake – The countdown to Memorial Day Weekend 2011 has begun. The last weekend in May marks the beginning of the summer season for area lakes, drawing thousands to the water for boating, skiing, swimming or sailing.

The GRDA Lake Police want to people to remember while they are preparing for the holiday to prepare to boat safely as well. Approximately 700 people drown each year from recreational boating accidents. That number could be lowered by simply buckling on a life jacket and following lake rules and regulations.

“The Lake Police encourages everyone to wear their life jackets and pay attention on the water,” said Charlie Floyd, GRDA Superintendent of Law Enforcement. “Pay attention to other boaters.”

GRDA Lake Police will be out on Grand Lake and Lake Hudson enforcing the regulations in order to make it a safe weekend for all visitors. They will also be “catching” boaters wearing their life jackets. This weekend will kick off the fifth season of the “I got caught wearing my life jacket” campaign, rewarding those who boat safely.

“The slogan has always been ‘it won’t work if you don’t wear it’,” said Floyd. “And it’s true. You can’t underestimate the importance of your life jacket. Those who are wearing their life jackets and making sure their children are wearing their life jackets are really setting an example of safe boating for everyone else on the water.”

GRDA also offers these other important safe boating tips for all those who will be hitting the water this weekend:

  • Before you leave the dock, know the stability, load capability and handling of the vessel you’re operating. All boats must be equipped with certain safety equipment. Learn how to properly use all safety equipment. Check the water conditions and know where hazards like sandbars and stump beds are located.
  • Before you leave home, check the weather; don’t get caught on the lake in a storm. Take time to double check to see if all your safety equipment is on the boat. The equipment required by law: personal floatation device (PFD) life preservers, anchor, bailing device, oars, fire extinguishers, lights, horn or whistle and throwable cushions.
  • Boaters, no matter what age, need a float plan. Tell someone where you are going and when you will return.
  • Most lake accidents are alcohol-related. “If you drink, don’t drive” certainly applies on the water!

“We believe our lakes are a great place for boating, skiing, fishing or just enjoying the water,” said Floyd, “but we just want everyone who visits our lakes this weekend to have a safe and enjoyable time. So please, use common sense and follow the boating rules.”

For more information on lake safety, proper life jacket sizing or lake rules, pick up your copy of the new 2011 GRDA Summer Lake Guide, contact the GRDA Police at (918) 782 9594

Boating Safety Course

It was in 2006 that the Oklahoma State Senators Kenneth Corn and Todd Lamb introduced legislation aimed at saving the lives of children and teenagers on Oklahoma Lakes. Senate Bill 1495, known as the Kyle Williams Boating Safety Education Act, became law in 2007.

Named after 12 year-old Kyle Williams who died as a result of a jet ski accident in 1994, the law prohibits kids between the ages of 12 and 16, without a valid drivers license, from operating any vessel powered by a motor of more than 10 horsepower or a sailing vessel 16 feet or longer without first completing a state-approved Boater Safety Course.

“We have had nearly 500 students take and successfully pass the Boater Safety Course” – Charlie Floyd, Superintendent of Law Enforcement

In an effort to educate the public about the law, and continuing with their own efforts to promote water safety, the Grand River Dam Authority’s Lake Police began offering safety courses free of charge in 2008. Initially, GRDA took classes to the kids, holding them in the communities around the lake or in classrooms of area schools. However, since the GRDA Ecosystems and Education Building was completed in the spring of 2010, the courses have been held at that location.

“We have had nearly 500 students take and successfully pass the Boater Safety Course,” said Charlie Floyd, Superintendent of Law Enforcement, who teaches the majority of the classes. “Our goal is to educate as many people as possible about safe behavior while boating or enjoying other water related activities on GRDA lakes in order to reduce the number of boating accidents or other injuries.

 

The classes are a full day, 8AM to 5PM, with a test. The test covers all the material that the students have learned during the day. After passing the test, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol will mail a certificate showing that the possessor has taken the course and passed the test. Children are required to carry the certificate while operating vessels.

Fines for violating the law range from $50 – $500. However, according to Floyd, the goal is not to hand out fines as much as it is to educate the public. He encourages adults to take the course as well.

“We feel that this education process is very valuable and we also feel that our efforts have been and continue to be successful. We have seen a dramatic decrease in boating accidents and prop strike accidents, as well as other injuries on boats and docks in the past couple of years,” said Floyd.

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GRDA addresses frequently asked cleanup questions

Langley – In the wake of an early February snowstorm that caused extensive damage to docks and marinas all around Grand Lake, the Grand River Dam Authority continues its effort to work with the public on restoration.  “We are certainly aware of the widespread damage,” said GRDA Ecosystems Management Superintendent Darrell Townsend, PhD, “and we want the public to know that we are here to help.”

While all GRDA dock-related regulations remain in place, Townsend said GRDA remains very sensitive to the special circumstances of this weather event. He added that a letter, sent by GRDA to all dock builders and marina owners, addresses the most frequently asked questions and concerns about dock repair efforts.

In the letter, GRDA addresses:

Safety

  • Immediately disconnect any electric power source to your damaged dock.
  • Debris and non-recyclable material should be removed from the water as soon as possible to prevent navigational hazards and following clean up activities.

Damage repair and dock replacement

“We understand there will be other issues and questions related to clean up and recovery,” said Townsend. “So we encourage affected dock owners to contact us. GRDA’s goal is to expedite this recovery process as quickly and safely as possible.”

For more information, contact the GRDA Ecosystems Management Department at (918) 256 0852.

  • You will not be required to contact GRDA or have prior permission from GRDA before beginning cleanup, repair or replacement of your dock provided you make no modifications to the footprint of the dock.
  • If you intend to replace your dock with a new structure you may do so only under the size and configuration of your existing permit.
  • Any modification to your docks outside your current permit will require a new permit. If you are not familiar with the size and configuration limitations of your permit, you may contact GRDA for a copy of your current permit.
  • Any modifications made to your dock, not consistent with your current permitted footprint, will need prior approval from GRDA and may require Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval.
  • All dock repair and replacement may be done only by a GRDA permitted dock builder. However, you may personally perform repairs to your own dock.
  • All damaged docks will require an electrical inspection completed by an Oklahoma licensed electrician, before these docks will be deemed in compliance.
  • If your dock is a total loss and you are going to completely replace it, encapsulated flotation must be used (according to GRDA’s current construction standards).
  • If the current dock flotation remains serviceable, it may remain. All flotation which is replaced must be replaced with encapsulated flotation.
  • Boats that are damaged and underwater must be removed. Boat owners do not need a license to remove the boats. However, if you do use a contractor, they must have a valid commercial operations permit issued by GRDA.
  • Contractors shall follow all state and federal environmental rules and regulations

Frequently Asked Questions

If we keep the size of the dock footprint the same can we reduce the number of slips with the current permit

The number slips may be reduced if the footprint remains exactly the same and no walkway changes are made.

New scaled drawings will need to be submitted to GRDA and the current permit will need to be updated if it is older than the current published form.

Photos of Dock Damage

Safety